--- much with success

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amby

Banned
chinese
I looked up a dictionary but I coud not find the correct answer for the following question. What is the correct verb? And why? Is it idiom? Then, what does that mean? ( my answer is met, but I am not sure)

His attempts to get into the swimming team have not___ with much success.

associated concluded joined .... met
 
  • Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    Your answer is right.

    To meet with = To be rewarded with/ to be punished with. E.g. His application failed - it met with a blank refusal.

    (In America, to meet with = to meet. E.g. He visited London and met with the Prime Minister. This is bad usage in Britain.)
     

    Linguo IS Dead

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Yes, it's an idiom. To me, it means something like "to result in", or "to receive [as a response]":

    His attempts to get into the swimming team have not resulted in much success.
    His application failed - it received a blank refusal.

    I also sometimes see it as "to be met with", and it means the same thing:

    Her suggestions for reducing spending were met with approval. = Her suggestions for reducing spending received approval.

    (In America, to meet with = to meet. E.g. He visited London and met with the Prime Minister. This is bad usage in Britain.)
    Actually, it's not quite the same as "to meet". That would imply just briefly shaking hands and exchanging pleasantries. "To meet with" indicates a longer interaction, possibly with a specific topic of discussion or a goal in mind. It's more formal than simply "to spend time with", but not quite as formal as "to have a meeting with" (although it's pretty close). To me:

    He visited London and met the Prime Minister. = They shook hands and said hello, possibly in a receiving line.
    He visited London and met with the Prime Minister. = They spent some time alone together, probably discussing some political issues, but possibly having a more general conversation as well.
    He visited London and had a meeting with the Prime Minister. = They got together for the sole purpose of discussing one or more issues, most likely political.

    And I had no idea this phrase wasn't used in Britain - interesting!
     
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