"mud in your eye"

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Acnalb

Member
Spanish,German,Catalan
Hello,
Recently I've heard the expression "mud in your eye" from people having a drink together and making a toast. I don't know if it's american English.
Anybody could explain the meaning and origin of this expression.
Thanks!
 
  • The Scrivener

    Banned
    England. English
    Hello,
    Recently I've heard the expression "mud in your eye" from people having a drink together and making a toast. I don't know if it's american English.
    Anybody could explain the meaning and origin of this expression.
    Thanks!
    Hello Acnalb,

    He declared . . . the latter British expression “Mud in your eye” derived from World War II when bombs exploded, soldiers in trenches that were just temporarily blinded by receiving mud in their eyes were very thankful to be alive. Thus when the British expression is used, it wishes long life, and good health . . .
    I found this when I googled.
     

    Cader Idris

    Senior Member
    Wales English
    I've also seen the Bible (John 9:1-41) given as the source for this expression.
    These verses relate to the curing of a blind man by Jesus, who put mud in his eyes. They are also the source for the phrase now usually quoted as "I was blind and now I see".
     

    mgarizona

    Senior Member
    US - American English
    Well the OED has citations back to 1927 so a WWII origin is out of the question. It gives no explanation for the phrase. I've always just assumed it meant "Here's to getting falling down drunk!" (Wherein that falling down would occasion said mud in said eye.)
     

    patrick_socal

    Senior Member
    USA-American English
    Interesting phrase in any event.
    The war origin has both WWII and trenches, trenches were of course more common in WWI, I wonder...
    still, you would expect a WWI expression to appear in print before 1927.
     
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