Muggy (weather): Does it imply "cloudy"?

Xavier da Silva

Senior Member
Hello everyone,

I'm trying to see if "muggy" meaning "warm and damp in an unpleasant way (weather)" implies that there are dark clouds preventing most of the sunlight. My question: Does "muggy" sound natural/correct in the example I made below?

When the weather is muggy there isn't much sunlight, but sometimes muggy weather is even hotter (than bright weather).

Thank you in advance!
 
  • Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    It has to do with humidity and warmth. A sunny afternoon following a rainy morning is often muggy - uncomfortably hot and humid.
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    No: "muggy" means warm and humid, usually unpleasantly so.

    It doesn't imply cloud obscuring sunlight: you can talk about a "muggy evening" after it's got dark.

    [cross-posted]
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    I found an article online which explains that "muggy" weather is the result of warm air temperature combined with high moisture content.

    It doesn't anywhere state that clouds are a factor in it.
     

    Xavier da Silva

    Senior Member
    Thank you all very much.

    I fixed that sentence above so it doesn't confuse other non-native speakers who arrive here in the future.

    I mentioned "clouds" when talking about "muggy" (weather) because "humidity" in the air usually means there was some rain or there's going to be some rain soon (at least here in Brazil), and "rain" needs clouds (and hot weather, in summer)

    I found really strange that English doesn't associate "muggy" with clouds in any way. It rains in the USA and England (a lot!).
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    I mentioned "clouds" when talking about "muggy" (weather) because "humidity" in the air usually means there was some rain or there's going to be some rain soon (at least here in Brazil), and "rain" needs clouds (and hot weather, in summer)
    Clouds are humidity at high altitudes: if the air up there is humid enough, it forms clouds. If it gets even more humid, the air cannot hold all the water, and it rains. "Muggy" means hot and humid at ground level. Sometimes ground level and 25,000 feet are equally humid. Other times they are not.

    I found really strange that English doesn't associate "muggy" with clouds in any way.
    The words "hot" and "humid" don't imply clouds. Why should a word that means "hot and humid"?

    If you live close to open water (a lake, a river, a delta, a swamp, a bayou, the ocean, etc.) it will be humid most of the time, and it will always be humid when it is hot. This is just as true on cloudless days. Even away from open water, many areas (Florida, Louisiana, Houston) are usually humid, while other equally-hot regions (Arizona, Lubbock, Death Valley) are rarely humid.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top