Multiple choice item : Thus/Hence/Therefore/Consequently

gpal

New Member
Greek
Hello Forumers, I would really like your help on an item I have just encountered that baffles me

'it rained heavily all night,______ the terrible flooding.'

a.Thus
b.Hence
c.therefore
d.consequently

I would really appreciate any help. Thank you.

Thus means ''in this way'', but cannot be the answer as it generally shows manner(even when its used as a synonym of therefore). Hence means 'from this/that',it usually refers to the future and is found in formal writing. It answers from where or what something derives and usually is about the future.Therefore relates to why something happened. it means 'for that reason'. Consequently means 'as a result of that'.
The problem is that most dictionaries give b/c/d as synonyms and interchangeable. Eliminating A for showing manner and b for the future reference and formal context it is found, I again am between two words that have the same meaning and are supposed to be synonyms.....I would go in the end with Therefore, consequently just seems to me it would need a fully developed sentence with a verb/subject etc etc...
 
Last edited:
  • JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Welcome gpal.

    In the Forum guidelines is a section on asking for help with such questions:

    If you wish to ask for discussion of options in a multiple choice question, please post:

    (1) the choices,
    (2) your own preferred answer, and
    (3) your reason for selecting an answer.

    Unless you tell us what you think, and why, we cannot offer comments.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Thanks for having a go at figuring it out:D
    Your problem stems from your (mis)understanding of the word "hence", which can be used in several ways:

    Hence means 'from this/that',it usually refers to the future and is found in formal writing. It answers from where or what something derives and usually is about the future.
    The dictionary has this entry:

    Hence

    sentence connector

    • for this reason; following from this; therefore
    adv
    • from this time: a year hence
    • archaic from here or from this world; away
    • from this origin or source
    It is the adverb form that is sometimes related to the future. The "for this reason; following as a (logical) result of this" meanings do not have any future component to them.

    In the example, it helps to understand that there are some words that have been omitted because they are understood when "hence" is used as a sentence connector is this structure:

    'it rained heavily all night, hence (there is) the terrible flooding.'
     

    gpal

    New Member
    Greek
    Thanks so much for your input guys. I can now understand the difference between the words given and how 'hence' is used.
     
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