Munchy

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HSS

Senior Member
Standard Japanese, Sendaian Japanese
'Munchy,' I believe, is derived from a sound that you may make when you munch on something. Now would you call liquids, which you don't munch on, munchy? How about something like watermelon --- could it be a munchy watermelon?
 
  • madsh33p

    Senior Member
    English - UK, German - Germany
    I have never heard anyone use the word 'munchy' before... You can have the munchies, but I have never heard 'munchy' used as an adjective.
     

    Matching Mole

    Senior Member
    England, English
    I've never heard "munchy" used for something tasty. May be it's BE.
    I don't think so. I have never heard of it used in this way either. There is a word munchy, but it does not mean "tasty". It means something that can be munched (also "munchable"), or the quality of being munchable. In this sense it is "originally and chiefly US", says the OED. E.g.:
    "Munchy materials include chips,..candy and of course nuts."

    It doesn't refer to taste as such at all.

    To munch means "To eat (food) with a continuous and noticeable chewing action ... To make a snack of" [OED]. It would in no way be suitable to describe liquids, unless, of course, when mixed with solids. Breakfast cereal would be a good example of that.
     

    madsh33p

    Senior Member
    English - UK, German - Germany
    That's funny, I had never thought of the 'munch' to refer to a certain type of food. I would have said you can munch anything. To me personally, 'munch' is either a less formal or 'correct' synonym for 'eat', or it could refer to a way of eating...maybe kind of a more relaxed way of eating. However, I do not base this on any evidence other than my personal understanding of it.
     

    Spira

    Banned
    UK English
    That's funny, I had never thought of the 'munch' to refer to a certain type of food. I would have said you can munch anything. To me personally, 'munch' is either a less formal or 'correct' synonym for 'eat', or it could refer to a way of eating...maybe kind of a more relaxed way of eating. However, I do not base this on any evidence other than my personal understanding of it.
    Munch is really very near chew in sense. If you can chew it, you can munch it. Which excludes all liquids or near-liquids.
    I don't believe it refers to the style of eating, relaxed or otherwise.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    Something that is munchy is usually something that is crunchy, in my opinion, if that helps at all. I can't imagine yoghurt being described as munchy, for example.

    In American English we might say: "Come on over and we'll have something to eat. Nothing formal; I'll just put out some things to munch on."

    We also use it in the plural as a noun. "Look at all the great munchies Linda put out for us." Munchies are snacks, finger foods, hors d'oeuvres or appetizers. They may or may not be crunchy, but they are usually either bite-sized treats or food that can be eaten in handfuls, such as potato chips (crisps) or nuts.

    In American English, "to munch" can be used like "to graze" or "to snack on". It does describe a style of eating here.
     
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    Spira

    Banned
    UK English
    If I told you that I was munching laboriously through the over-cooked gala dinner at the French embassy when President Sarkozy fell head first into the custard, that's not a relaxed situation, is it?
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    It is a specific use of it here, Spira. I wouldn't say "I was munching on my boeuf bourgignon when the president made a witty remark." Munching implies a casual setting here. I can accept that it may not be the same in British English.

    Munching (on) something here usually means snacking on something in the U.S. It is having a snack or eating a handful of something. It can mean literally munching on something but it is most commonly used as snacking on something. I think British English sometimes uses "browsing" the way we use "munching".
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    I agree with James. In my own speech I munch on things that are crunchy or crispy. Most salty snack foods qualify, as do raw vegetables or fruit. Like James, I wouldn't ordinarily talk about people "munching their dinners". I never use the adjective "munchy" to describe food, nor do I hear anybody else using it in my region. I occasionally hear and use the noun "munchies": I bought some munchies at the convenience store.
     
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    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    OK I'll 'fess up since no-one else has. "I've got the munchies" is an expression (used only in the plural like that) often used by people after they've smoked a bit of pot (medicinal pot is actually used as an appetite stimulant). It means they're hungrier than they would otherwise have been and ANYTHING, DUDE, that satisfies that craving will suffice, no matter what the texture or sound it makes. It does tend to be solids and semi-solids but liquids with substance can be quite delicious. Or so I'm told :D
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    'Munchy,' I believe, is derived from a sound that you may make when you munch on something. Now would you call liquids, which you don't munch on, munchy? How about something like watermelon --- could it be a munchy watermelon?
    The dictionary.com definition says it all for me:
    –adjective Also, munchie.
    1. (of food) a. crunchy or chewy.
    b. Informal . for snacking: munchy foods like popcorn and cookies.
    –noun
    2. munchies, Informal . food suitable or meant for snacking: Munchies were served before dinner.
    3. the munchies, Slang . hunger, esp. a craving for sweets or snacks: suffering from the munchies.
    [...]
    Dictionary.com Unabridged
    Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2010.
    So, no, a liquid can't be munchy. I suppose a water melon might be - I don't know, I never eat them (can't bear the texture:D).
     

    HSS

    Senior Member
    Standard Japanese, Sendaian Japanese
    Thanks for all your input, everyone. I must have gotten the wrong, or off-the-mark, sense of the word, at least when I've used it to mean something is delicious. For the meaning of being crunchy, crispy, chewy, etc. to describe snacks, I've used it right. The former must have come from my satisfied utterance of 'Mmmm, munchy-munchy.'


    As for 'have the munchies,' I've known this expression for a long time, but just a quick look-up in dictionaries has given me a new usage of 'the munchies.' You may also say something like 'He suffered from the munchies,' meaning 'He was real hungry.'
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Hello, Hiro. You could say "He suffered from the munchies". It is more common to hear "He (really) had the munchies".
     
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