Muniakowice - toponym etymology

ajitam

New Member
Serbo-Croatian
It's the name of a village in the south of Poland. I'm interested in its etymology. I'm not familiar with Polish so any hints as well as explanations would be helpful. The suffix -wice, can it be of patronymic nature?
 
  • jasio

    Senior Member
    The suffix -wice, can it be of patronymic nature?
    Don't think so.

    Maybe quite a few families, named Muniak, lived there.
    Don't you think that you're contradicting yourself? ;-)

    It's the name of a village in the south of Poland. I'm interested in its etymology. I'm not familiar with Polish so any hints as well as explanations would be helpful. The suffix -wice, can it be of patronymic nature?
    According to Nazwy patronimiczne – Wikipedia, wolna encyklopedia, -wice, -wiec, -wicze and a handful of other suffixes do have (or may have) a patronymic origin indeed.

    According to Muniakowice – Wikipedia, wolna encyklopedia, the oldest reference to the name was dated in 1222, as "Monacouici" (in Latin); a hundred or so years later - as "Moniacowicz" - and since then the iota is consistently used in the village name. The article also says that it had originally been a knight's village, so it could be possible that the original owner or the founder was called Moniak (or Monac in the medieval orthography) - albeit my quick scan for the medieval noble family with this surname was unsuccessful, so it's a speculation. There are modern families with this surname though.

    EDIT: Google-translated pages which can serve you better:
     
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