Muscle strain/ muscle sprain / muscle tear

< Previous | Next >

Galván

Senior Member
Spanish
None of the threads explain this clearly, except for one thread that is closed for further replies and was not clearly stated.

Here is my understanding in order of severity:

1) Muscle strain or strained muscle is "distensión muscular".
2) A muscle sprain es una torsión o estiramiento de un ligamento en el músculo (coloquialmente conocida como torcedura muscular).
También: lesión muscular o un esguince muscular.
3) A muscle tear is "desgarro muscular" y es mucho más serio.

There seems to be confusion around these terms, and it should be noted that each one of these terms are different.

Please correct me if I'm wrong.

Thank you
 
Last edited:
  • AbogadoPeter

    Senior Member
    English - USA (medical & legal)
    To understand more clearly, it helps to review the anatomy.

    Muscles contract, resulting in movement.
    Tendons attach muscles to bones.
    Most ligaments hold bones together in joints, in this context.

    "Sprains" usually involve ligament or tendon, rather than muscles. No existe "un ligamento en el músculo". They are as serious, or more, than a torn muscle (or even some fractures) since healing can be prolonged and difficult.

    High Ankle Sprain - Podiatry, Orthopedics, & Physical Therapy
     

    Attachments

    Galván

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Gracias abogadopeter, entonces ¿se puede hablar de un esguince muscular? o tampoco corresponde ya que un esguince comprende ligamentos los cuales no forman parte de un músculo.
     

    AbogadoPeter

    Senior Member
    English - USA (medical & legal)
    ¿se puede hablar de un esguince muscular?
    No creo, aunque puede ser que mucha gente no hace la distinción.

    Esta publicación del Mayo Clinic lo define bien, creo:

    "Un esguince es un estiramiento o desgarro de los ligamentos, las bandas resistentes de tejido fibroso que conectan dos huesos en las articulaciones. La ubicación más común de un esguince es el tobillo.

    * * *

    La diferencia entre un esguince y una distensión es que el primero lesiona las bandas de tejido que conectan dos huesos, mientras que la segunda implica una lesión de un músculo o de la banda de tejido que une un músculo a un hueso."
    Esguinces - Síntomas y causas - Mayo Clinic
     

    Galván

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    No creo, aunque puede ser que mucha gente no hace la distinción.

    Esta publicación del Mayo Clinic lo define bien, creo:

    "Un esguince es un estiramiento o desgarro de los ligamentos, las bandas resistentes de tejido fibroso que conectan dos huesos en las articulaciones. La ubicación más común de un esguince es el tobillo.

    * * *

    La diferencia entre un esguince y una distensión es que el primero lesiona las bandas de tejido que conectan dos huesos, mientras que la segunda implica una lesión de un músculo o de la banda de tejido que une un músculo a un hueso."
    Esguinces - Síntomas y causas - Mayo Clinic
    Gracias abogadoPeter. Me ha quedado todo clarísimo.:thumbsup:
     

    ChemaSaltasebes

    Senior Member
    Castellano (España)
    Sólo por ver si a mí también me ha quedado claro:

    Sprain, distensión ligamentosa
    Strain, distensión muscular
    Tear, desgarro (muscular o ligamentoso)
     

    LVRBC

    Senior Member
    English-US, standard and medical
    Just to complicate our lives, what would be the correct translation for avulsion? That occurs when a ligament, tendon or muscle attachment is pulled off the bone. ¿Se dice avulsión? Mi spellcheck no lo quiere aceptar pero tiene muchas dificiencias. Igual que yo.
     

    ChemaSaltasebes

    Senior Member
    Castellano (España)
    Hi LVRBC!
    We do use fracturas por avulsión or avulsión ligamentosa to refer to a ligament or tendon so violently un-attached from bone that a part of the bone is also pulled out with the ligament.
     

    LVRBC

    Senior Member
    English-US, standard and medical
    Gracias. Que gusto ver a ti y al AbogadoP en el mismo hilo.
     

    Mr.Dent

    Senior Member
    English - all over the USA
    Sprains are graded: level I,II or III.
    A grade III sprain is a complete tear of the affected ligament(s).
    Grade II is an incomplete tear.
    Grade I is overstretching of the ligament possibly with some micro-tearing.
     

    ChemaSaltasebes

    Senior Member
    Castellano (España)
    Sprains are graded: level I,II or III.
    That's an interesting point, Mr. Dent; when talking about a joint sprain (i.e. an ankle sprain), it should be translated as esguince, where grado I (overstretching of the ligament with micro-tearing) specifically conveys a distensión ligamentosa; grado II (incomplete tear) would convey a desgarro ligamentoso or rotura parcial/incompleta; and esguince grado III (complete ligament tear) would convey a rotura ligamentosa; desgarro/rotura completa.

    The same goes for muscular strains (distensión muscular), which are classified in a similar fashion as grado I (structural damage of muscle only on microscopic level; desgarro leve); grado II (nearly half of the muscle fibers are torn; desgarro parcial); and grado III (complete rupture of the muscle; desgarro completo).

    As usual, we can attempt general approximations to just any term but the specific context is basic to deliver a sound translation.

    And, by the way, thank you for your kind words LVRBC; it is always a pleasure thinking aloud with experts like yourself and AbogadoPeter (and EricEnfermero, Angélica, Mr. Dent and so many more) from both sides of our English-Spanish line. ¡Saludos!
     
    Last edited:
    < Previous | Next >
    Top