museum reservation [= exclusive use of museum by a group?]

Snappy_is_here

Senior Member
Japanese
Can I use the expression "museum reservation" to refer to an act of a group of people making an arrangement with a museum to use the entire museum exclusively(no other visitors can enter on the day)?
Is it possible to use the expression "museum reservations" if groups of people are making arrangements with museums to use them exclusively?
 
  • suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    I would say booking.
    Reservation is possible, you won't be understood if you said that, because I don't think anyone would assume "exclusive use" unless you said that explicitly.

    Maybe "We've hired the museum for the day" would be best.
     
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    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Maybe "We've hired the museum for the day" would be best.
    I think hiring usually involves things which you can take away with you, like cars or mechanical diggers.

    I'd stick to your original word. We've booked the museum for the day suggests that you will have exclusive use, but the idea is slightly unusual, so, like you, I'd probably add an explicit statement about exclusive use.

    One could also consider We've taken the museum for the day but that would need further explanation too, I think.
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Thank you suzi br and Thomas.
    Can I use "Exclusive museum reservations" or "Museum reservations for exclusive use?" if they are used for signboards?
    It's hard to say, unless you give us more information.

    Someone should have told you that bookings was a better word, in most imaginable contexts here, than reservations, which often implies a temporary arrangement - you can reserve something before committing yourself to booking it.

    Tell us a great deal more about what you are planning, and we can give better advice on what you should write on your signboards.
     

    Snappy_is_here

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Thanks, Thomas,
    I wrote "signboards" for an example.
    If I want to use the expression for tourist information in a pamphlet for example, can I say, "Museum bookings are available for exclusive use" or "Exclusive museum tours are available?"
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Thanks, Thomas,
    I wrote "signboards" for an example.
    If I want to use the expression for tourist information in a pamphlet for example, can I say, "Museum bookings are available for exclusive use" or "Exclusive museum tours are available?"
    Please Snappy, take me seriously.

    We need MUCH MORE INFORMATION about your plan, if we are to help you with this, in my view. Otherwise we waste our time and yours. Where is this museum? What other sources of information are available to your readers? What is your commercial relationship with the people you are addressing? and so on...

    A minute ago there were signboards. Now you tell us that the signboards were 'for an example'. Tell us in detail what you are doing and you make it easy for us to help you accurately.
     

    Snappy_is_here

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    I am sorry. In fact, I am preparing a questionnaire for tourists. It will be a question item.
    The question will be something like:

    "What events, plans, etc. interest you in Japan? Please select your answer(s):
    1. Exclusive museum tour 2. Japanese tea ceremony experience 3. Special admission to temples and shrines 4. Japanese cooking class 5. Kimono dressing experience. 5. Others"
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I am sorry. In fact, I am preparing a questionnaire for tourists. It will be a question item.
    The question will be something like:

    "What events, plans, etc. interest you in Japan? Please select your answer(s):
    1. Exclusive museum tour 2. Japanese tea ceremony experience 3. Special admission to temples and shrines 4. Japanese cooking class 5. Kimono dressing experience. 5. Others"
    What is your role? Who are these tourists? Is this a commercial visit?
     

    Szkot

    Senior Member
    UK English
    We seem to have departed from the original question about the use of the word 'reservation'. Suzi suggested 'hire', and my local national museum offers 'venue-hire' for organisations wanting use the museum for functions such as conference dinners.

    For your questionnaire, however, I think the key words are private and exclusive to suggest that the general public are excluded. For example, my local palace advertises 'This very special Private Guided Morning Tour allows visitors the opportunity to experience the charm of the Palace of Holyroodhouse when it is closed ...'

    Add: 'Out-of-hours' can also be used to convey the idea of having the place to yourself.
     
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    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    I think hiring usually involves things which you can take away with you, like cars or mechanical diggers.
    I often hire the Matthews Hall, just around the corner from where I live. There's a list of hire charges. If I was talking about exclusive use of a museum I'd probably use the verb "to book" when discussing it. If I was offering a holiday event "Exclusive museum tour" seems a good choice to me.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    I think hiring usually involves things which you can take away with you, like cars or mechanical diggers.
    This implies that I am mistaken to suggest "hiring" in your context.

    This is not the case. Different / quirky venues routinely advertise themselves as available for hire.

    Eg the London Museum:
    Weddings and private hire

    However, I certainly DO agree with Thomas about your terrible lack of context. We have really wasted time and maybe even given misleading guidance because you were not explicit about your actual needs

    If you read the museum link I have added you can get ideas about how people market their venues in the UK.
     
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    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    < Topic drift removed. Cagey, moderator. >

    I don't talk of hiring houses or fields. I talk of letting houses or fields. Why don't we think hiring is appropriate there? Or perhaps some people do. If they explain that they do, so much the better; they will thereby expand everyone's knowledge of how the language is used.
     
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    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    < Topic drift removed. Cagey, moderator >

    A quick look at the OED shows us that the use of hire can be get for temporary us ANYTHING . Furthermore "hiring a room" is far from a new-fangled thing that you might have missed. Here it is being used for hiring a house way back in 1583.

    2. To procure the temporary use of (any thing) for stipulated payment. Also intr.

    1583 C. Hollyband Campo di Fior 327 He had hired a house in Colme~streate.

    ----------------

    Googling "hire" and any the name of any major UK museum could yield ample evidence of the verb being used as I suggested to the OP.
     
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