Mushy = negative?

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mikichan

Senior Member
Chinese
I googled and found a recipie called “mushy pea curry” but other than that, this word “mushy” seems to used only in a negative context, such as “No one likes mussy curry.” When a dish is described as “mushy” as in "The potatoes are mushy.", is it usually negative, or can it be neutral (maybe it's meant to be mushy for some dishes)?


If it is negative, could you tell me how you woud say it instead?
How about “The potatoes are cooked well and very soft”?


Thank you.
 
  • e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    The word mushy suggests that you have a thick soup. Mushy peas (often eaten with fish and chips) are probably called this because of their high water content.
    One normally avoids having mushy potatoes, but there are recipes for making them -- again this seems to involve the addition of too much water and e.g. cream.
    I might describe mushy potatoes as "The potatoes are overcooked/well cooked and have the consistency of thick soup".

    There may be a connection with the verb to mash, i.e. we have mashed potatoes (having a soft, pulpy mass). This is normal, but if you put too much liquid in them, they become mushy,
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    From Googling, I see the recipe is made with "mushy peas" (from a can that says "mushy peas"). It's (mushy pea) curry, not mushy (pea curry).
    (We don't have these in the US so it sounds strange to us either way. ;))
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Having had mushy peas (though not in a curry) often in the U.K., I don't see it as negative - though if it is applied to something that shouldn't be mushy, it would be. I think the negative conceptions of this word are due to the fact that most things shouldn't be mushy.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    From Googling, I see the recipe is made with "mushy peas" (from a can that says "mushy peas"). It's (mushy pea) curry, not mushy (pea curry)
    Good Lord, no! Tinned mushy peas! They are made from dried marrowfat peas, soaked overnight in water with a little sodium bicarbonate. My northern daughter-in-law would throw the tin at you, not open it. Mind you, as far as I'm concerned, the best place for them is in a tin, preferably buried at the bottom of the garden.
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    "mushy" can run the gamut of positive to negative. It all depends on the context, even when it regards food.

    One man's mushy oatmeal is disgusting where another man's mushy oatmeal is just right. Sort of like Goldilocks.
     
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