Musical notes

Discussion in 'All Languages' started by Outsider, May 26, 2006.

  1. Outsider Senior Member

    Portuguese (Portugal)
  2. diegodbs

    diegodbs Senior Member

    Madrid
    Spain-Spanish
    Spanish: do re mi fa sol la si
     
  3. Jana337

    Jana337 Senior Member

    čeština
    Czech: do re mi fa sol la si

    Accent marks aside, do you expect any deviations from this pattern? :confused:

    Jana
     
  4. Outsider Senior Member

    Portuguese (Portugal)
    In English, they use letters to name the notes. I was wondering if other languages did the same.
     
  5. Whodunit

    Whodunit Senior Member

    กรุงเทพมหานคร
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    At least, I do. :)

    In German we usually call them

    C, D, E, F, G, A, H

    The only letter that is different from the English system is the H, which would be "B" in English. The German "B", however, corresponds to the English "B flat". :)

    Jana, if you want to express major and minor keys in Czech, how would you do that? In German it's quite easy:
    C-Dur, D-Dur, E-Dur, ...
    a-Moll, h-Moll, cis-Moll, ...

    To expand your knowledge of German musical terms, you might have a look at this. :)
     
  6. Jana337

    Jana337 Senior Member

    čeština
    Actually, we do the same. :) Both the above and these letters are used in my country. :rolleyes:
    Same. :)

    Jana
     
  7. Whodunit

    Whodunit Senior Member

    กรุงเทพมหานคร
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    But would you still say that the "do re mi" thing is more popular in your country? I think it is in France (I'd like to have a confirmation :)), but it is definitely not in Germany.
     
  8. Jana337

    Jana337 Senior Member

    čeština
    I'd say everyone knows both, but at school you are more likely to encounter the letters.

    Jana
     
  9. combustion

    combustion Senior Member

    Lugo (RAVENNA)
    Italian, Italy, Ravenna
    Italian: Do, re, mi, fa, sol, la, si
    The musical notes names derives from the first six verses of a latin hymn to San Giovanni Battista (Saint John?): UT queant laxis / REsonare fibris / MIra gestorum / FAmuli tuorum / SOLve polluti / LAbii reatum, Sancte Iohannes
    Only the UT changed in DO!
    comb...

    PS: mods... I don't know if I can post the hymn... sorry if I can't!

    EDIT: the hymn is enough old to be not protected by copyright, Jana confirmed me that!
     
  10. TarisWerewolf Senior Member

    Kanadassa
    Canada (English)
    As a musician, the way I learned it is that the do re mi are used in most countries for solfège singing (singing without note names, seeing the relationships of notes to keys, etc...). Some countries use them as the names of the notes too.

    And to add French to the list:

    Ut Ré Mi Fa Sol La Si Ut

    Sharps are called Dièse and flats are Bémol.

    So you have for G-sharp minor, Sol Dièse mineur; and for D-flat major, you have Ré Bémol majeur

    And yes, it's "si", not "Ti" like in English. In English, we use movable-do solfège where "Do" is the tonic note of whatever scale/key you're in. So if the piece is in A, Do is the note A. If you're in E-flat, Do is the note E-flat, and so on.

    The French (and many other countries, I believe), use fixed Do where Do/Ut is always the note C.
     
  11. ronanpoirier

    ronanpoirier Senior Member

    Porto Alegre
    Brazil - Portuguese
    In Portuguese, sharps are called sustenidos (sing. = sustenido) and flats are called bemóis (sing. = bemol).
    C major would be called dó maior
    C minor would be called dó menor
    C, D, E, etc. are used only to show the chords and we call each note by its name (dó, ré, mi, etc.)

    In Hungarian it would be:
    C major = C-Hang
    C minor = C-Moll
    Sorry, but I don't know about the notes (however I believe it follows the same pattern).
     
  12. shaloo

    shaloo Senior Member

    India
    English
    Namastey!

    Can anyone please tell me about the 7 musical notes in the european languages(esp.,french,italian and spanish)?

    In the Indian language, they call the seven notes as 'saptaswar' where
    sapta means 'seven' and swar means 'notes'.

    The seven sacred musical notes are:

    Sa - Rey - Ga - Ma - Pa - Dha - Nee - Sa

    The first Sa starts with a low pitch and the last one has the highest pitch of all the swar.

    P.S: My french professor said that these notes exixt in french classical music too.And so, I want to know more about it.

    Merci à tous !
     
  13. Honour Senior Member

    Istanbul
    Türkçe, Türkiye
    Turkish:
    do re mi fa sol la si
    si bemol (half up)
    si diyez (half down)
     
  14. Whodunit

    Whodunit Senior Member

    กรุงเทพมหานคร
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    Namaste!

    You can use this pattern. (I know it's a German one, but you can see where each note is situated).
     
  15. optimistique Senior Member

    In Dutch both the "Do re mi fa sol la si do" (we repeat the 'do' to complete the octave) and the 'C D E F G A B C' are used. Do always corresponds to C. The letters are more used in practice.

    For C sharp we say Cis, so Cis Dis Eis Fis Gis Ais Bis
    C flat is Ces, so Ces Des Es Fes Ges As Bes

    Double sharped C (???) becomes Cisis etc.
    Double flatted C becomes Ceses

    And for the sake of completeness: C major is C groot/C majeur
    and c minor is c klein/c mineur
     
  16. alby Senior Member

    Zagreb
    Croatia
    In Croatian: Do, Re, Mi, Fa, So, La, Ti, Do

    Nataša
     
  17. linguist786 Senior Member

    Blackburn, England
    English, Gujarati & Urdu
    In Gujarati, they say something like:

    Sa Re Ga Ma Pa

    I'm not sure though, i'll have to check this.
     
  18. shaloo

    shaloo Senior Member

    India
    English
    Dhanyavaad Whodunit,

    It means 'Thankyou'.

    Shaloo
     
  19. shaloo

    shaloo Senior Member

    India
    English
    Merci a tous !!

    Your help has been greatly useful in enhancing my knowledge.

    Merci encore,

    Shaloo
     
  20. linguist786 Senior Member

    Blackburn, England
    English, Gujarati & Urdu
    धन्यवाद ;)

    :p
     
  21. shaloo

    shaloo Senior Member

    India
    English
    Merci beaucoup !
     
  22. Chazzwozzer

    Chazzwozzer Senior Member

    Istanbul
    Turkish
    Turkish:
    do, re, mi, fa, sol, la, si
     
  23. albondiga Senior Member

    Brazil
    English/USA
    Does anyone know where the sa-re-ga-ma-pa... comes from?
     
  24. sam1978

    sam1978 Senior Member

    Genoa/Genova
    italy - italiano
    The same for the Italian language :)
     
  25. apmoy70

    apmoy70 Senior Member

    Greek
    Greek:

    Western Music: «ντο, ρε, μι, φα, σολ, λα, σι, ντο» [dɔ ɾe mi fa sɔl la si dɔ]
    Byzantine Music: «νη, πα, βου, γα, δι, κε, ζω, νη» [ni pa vu ɣa ði ce zɔ ni]
     
  26. tsoapm

    tsoapm Senior Member

    Le Marche, Italy
    English (England)
    Interesting: so you take the Latin syllables for the fixed-pitch system whereas the Byzantine syllables are relative in terms of pitch?

    I imagine the concept of moveable do is a very hard sell in do-re-mi countries. I tried to explain it to an Italian colleague once in Italian but it made both of our heads hurt.
     
  27. apmoy70

    apmoy70 Senior Member

    Greek
    Indeed, Byzantine Music is Modal therefore in the Plagal 2 Mode, which is based on Pa, Vou is flat. In the 1st Diatonic Mode, which is based again on Pa, Vou is a bit flatter than in the fixed-pitch Western scale, yet not so flat as in Plagal 2, in both Modes however, Vou is Vou :)
     
  28. Yendred Senior Member

    Paris
    Français - France
  29. tsoapm

    tsoapm Senior Member

    Le Marche, Italy
    English (England)
    You’ve blinded me with science there @apmoy70 !
     

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