'must have'+'for to' or 'for it to be'?

< Previous | Next >

KatyKim

New Member
Korean
-Right! I've heard about a new restaurant I ate at being 'put on the map.'
-Yes, something as well as someone can be put on the map-or in other words, become famous, popular, or well known. You must have been eaten at a good quality restaurant for it to be put on the map!


I don't know what 'for it to be put on the map' means in this sentence, but I know what 'put on the map' means.Is
Is 'for it to be...' a sort of an idiom or a phrase? or is it related to 'must have' grammatically? or maybe.. is it a collocation?
Anybody please help me): You can just tell me what kind of grammar part is or rephrase that sentence but i'm waiting for your kind and detailed explanation if you can:)
 
  • RedwoodGrove

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    The fact that it was "put on the map" indicates that you were eating at a really good restaurant.

    In other words

    It isn't completely idiomatic in the original but most people would understand it without trouble.

    Another way of understanding it is: for X to be true, then Y must be true.

    The boss must have given you a raise for you to be dancing around like this.
     

    KatyKim

    New Member
    Korean
    The fact that it was "put on the map" indicates that you were eating at a really good restaurant.

    In other words

    It isn't completely idiomatic in the original but most people would understand it without trouble.

    Another way of understanding it is: for X to be true, then Y must be true.

    The boss must have given you a raise for you to be dancing around like this.
    First, thanks for your reply:) So, can I understand the last sentence's meaning is that 'as I see you dancing around like this, the boss must have given you a raise'? Did I understand well?
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top