mutter vs growl

ullas84

Senior Member
turkish
what is the difference between ''mutter'' and ''growl''?

'My name is Hareton Earnshaw' growled the young man.

'God help us!A visitor!' he muttered to himself
 
  • Matthewc555

    Member
    English
    Growl is an aggressive noise while to mutter is to speak quietly and indirectly they are not the least bit similar. The only similarly that I can think of is they are both considered odd to do, if you growl it will make a person feel odd, if you mutter it may have the same result, with that being said I would not suggest doing either of these out in public as it is not considered proper or polite.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Growl is an aggressive noise while to mutter is to speak quietly and indirectly they are not the least bit similar. The only similarly that I can think of is they are both considered odd to do, if you growl it will make a person feel odd, if you mutter it may have the same result, with that being said I would not suggest doing either of these out in public as it is not considered proper or polite.
    Dogs growl when playing too. So it is not always an expression of aggression.

    Dogs also growl to show annoyance which may or may not lead to aggressive behavior.

    Dog growls have a tonal range and perceptive dog owners can "read" the meaning behind a growl. The dog's body language also helps in deciphering the growl.

    Dogs also whine, whimper and bark with various tonal ranges for these too with changing meanings.
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    I think mutter is a new Latin word from muttum while grawl is not.
    Not according to the OED. It says mutter is from Middle English (i.e. late mediaeval) and probably imitative. However, as you say, there is a classical Latin verb muttio with a very similar meaning. Now, similarity doesn't necessarily mean cause and effect, but...?
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top