mutton <brought round hot and savoury>

park sang joon

Senior Member
Korean
The protagonist, Philip, who was born with a club foot, moved in with his uncle Mr. Carey, the Vicar of Blackstable after his mother's death.
He came to Paris to become a painter.
He and Lawson is holding a party at their studio with a room.
...........................
The feast consisted of a pot-au-feu, which Miss Chalice had made, of a leg of mutton roasted round the corner and brought round hot and savoury (Miss Chalice had cooked the potatoes, and the studio was redolent of the carrots she had fried; fried carrots were her specialty); and this was to be followed by poires flambees, pears with burning brandy, which Cronshaw had volunteered to make.
[Of Human Bondage by Somerset Maugham]
I'd like to know if "brought round hot and savoury" means "gotten about hot and savoury."
Thank you in advance for your help
 
  • Glasguensis

    Signal Modulation
    English - Scotland
    No. You are incorrectly splitting the sentence. The mutton was brought round [the corner] from the shop. It was also hot and savoury.
     

    park sang joon

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Thank you, Glasguensis, for your so very kind answer. :)
    I was So wondering what you deduced "from the shop" from.
    Then I'd like to know what "round" before "hot and savoury" means.
     

    Glasguensis

    Signal Modulation
    English - Scotland
    The fact that it was roasted round the corner, and that it goes on to say that she cooked the potatoes herself, suggests to me that she bought the leg of mutton from a shop. But it's possible that a friend roasted it for her. In any case "brought round" means carried from where it was roasted to the current location.
     
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