Mutual fund

Thomas1

Senior Member
polszczyzna warszawska
Is there any mistake in the sentence: For example, a mutual fund might have returned 50% last year, but still have a YOY return of 12%.? I found it in a dictionary and think there's a mistake, shouldn't be 'has' instead of 'have'?

Thanks for help,
Thomas
 
  • foxfirebrand

    Senior Member
    Southern AE greatly modified by a 1st-generation Scottish-American mother, and growing up abroad.
    Simple answer: "but still have" is an elided form where might is implied-- does substituting "but still might have" clarify the problem of subject-verb agreement for you? "Has is incorrect here."

    I have some amazing insights on why your question is too confusing for any speaker of Modern English to understand-- they are not helpful for a learner, because they do the opposite of clarifying. I have exhausted my mental and physical reserves on these labors, but that's probably a good thing. If I manage to wrestle the question into incoherent form, I will start a thread about the very-much-alive subjunctive mood in English-- something we continue to use even though its forms have died. We do this unawares, and by ill-thought-out and unagreed-upon substitutions from the conditional, and this abuse has caused that mood/tense to fall into the same disarray that signaled the "death" of the subjunctive many decades ago.

    I will include the word "subjunctive" in the post title as a caveat against opening it. Meanwhile, I am not surprised that your post accumulates many reads but no replies. If anyone ventures the correct opinion that "have" is correct instead of "has," I guarantee you they will not be able to tell you why. More than likely, neither will I.
    .
    edit/deletion-substitution:
    new format changes have made deletion of head-swimming material impossible! Is this a new program that does for insanity what SpellCheck does for misspelling? If so it needs serious tweaking!

    Also, I'm having trouble with navigation and other functions. ctrl+up/down arrow doesn't move the cursor from paragraph to paragraph. And sometimes ctrl+i returns it to the end of the prior italicized word in the text.
    .
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    I happily defer to FFB for the technical, grammatical, and otherwise interesting answers. Here's a simple approach:

    For example, a mutual fund might have returned 50% last year, but still have a YOY return of 12%.?
    There is no mistake here. The fund might have returned X but the fund might still have a( BE abbreviation for BE term {year on year}) return of Y.



    A couple of points maybe worth noting....

    might have returned X could lead you to think that is should be read as,
    "might still have had a return of Y" to keep the tenses more or less aligned.

    However, this is not necessary, and would be wrong, not based on grammar, but on the logic of the statement. "Might have returned" refers to a period that ended at the close of the last calendar or fiscal year.
    "Might still have a return" refers to a 12 month period that continues up to today.

    This is not very good financial writing. It would have been more clear to say something like, " the fund might have earned X last calendar/fiscal year, but have a return for the 12 months to date of Y percent.

    The IRR (internal rate of return) of grammatical discourse is always an asymptote to zero for some of us.
     

    foxfirebrand

    Senior Member
    Southern AE greatly modified by a 1st-generation Scottish-American mother, and growing up abroad.
    Well, I'm glad the financial truth of the matter is as limpid as the grammatical.

    Here's a phrase (one of many) in my struggles with the subject:

    Can you "have a return of" in the present tense? There is an irrefutable futurity implied-- the stock will return a profit at whatever rate it might return, depending on circumstances.

    Clarify this, and you might help me untie a knot or two on the grammatical level. I also dealt with "have a return" as a completed action.
    .
     

    mjscott

    Senior Member
    American English
    Thomas1 said:
    Is there any mistake in the sentence: For example, a mutual fund might have returned 50% last year, but still have a YOY return of 12%.? I found it in a dictionary and think there's a mistake, shouldn't be 'has' instead of 'have'?

    Thanks for help,
    Thomas
    ....To have a YOY (year-over-year) return of 12% sounds OK to me. A school might just as well have a large percentage of their students pass the state exam each year, and say, "We have a large percentage of students who pass the state exam each year,"--even if the school year isn't up and the test haven't been administered yet. Sounds like in the above that they had a SUPER year last year, and this year might not be as good as last year, but still year over year we have a (reputable) return of 12%.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top