mutual work/cooperation

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slavipet

Senior Member
Bulgaria
Hi everyone,
I wonder whether mutual work means exact same thing as cooperation in the following context: Creating a good atmosphere for our clients is an integral part of our mutual work/cooperation.
Is there a clear-cut difference in usage?
Thanks,
slavipet
 
  • Pidginboy

    Senior Member
    India-Local dialect
    Mutual cooperation refers to the help received by one from the other and vice versa. I have never come across the collocation 'mutual work'; mutual cooperation is a well-accepted phrase.
     

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    I agree with Pidginboy and will go further to say that the sentence doesn't make sense to me with "mutual work". In fact, I'm not even sure that "mutual cooperation" works if you're talking about the employees in a business.

    Perhaps you could better explain what the intent is?
     

    slavipet

    Senior Member
    Bulgaria
    Thanks again :)
    mutual work - refers to the co-work between a company staff and its clients. Since I have to edit this text and I am a non-native speaker and it's translated by a non-native speaker I find it very difficult because my own language also interferes.
     

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Slavipet, this really doesn't work. You begin your sentence by referring to what you, the company want to do for your clients ("Creating a good atmosphere for our clients is an integral part...").

    By referring to the mutual work between the company and the clients, you are partly putting the onus on the clients to create the good atmosphere for themselves.

    In fact, even with my doubts about the phrase, it did not occur to me that you meant between the company and its clients. If anything, it seems that you mean among the company's staff.

    This doesn't work either, but the meaning of "between the company and its clients" that you ascribe to the phrase isn't at all good.
     
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