My baby is a miracle because I had him ....

Mr.X Senior

Senior Member
Burmese & English (2nd Language)
This is the sentence I read on an on lie forum. It reads :


"My baby is a miracle because I had him when ..."

After consulting dictionarys , I am still confuse.

Miracle is an event, could baby a miracle ?

Having a baby could be miracle but not baby itself.

Enlighten me please.
 
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  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Here, the speaker is telling us that her baby is "a miraculous being". That is, she thinks it a miracle that her baby was born at all. That is probably because the baby's birth was difficult.
     

    Mr.X Senior

    Senior Member
    Burmese & English (2nd Language)
    Thank owlman5.

    I do understand the speaker's meaning which you had explained.

    However the defination of the miracle , as I understand, literately is an event. I am more concern about the usage.

    Would not it be the same as "The patient was diagnosed with cancer" ? Here as well it's not the patient who is diagnosed with cancer but the patient's sickness is.
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Rest assured, Mr. X Senior, that calling a baby a "miracle" is a perfectly ordinary thing to do in English. It implies no more than that the speaker cherishes that baby and is glad and surprised that it's alive.

    The words "miracle" and "miraculous" often refer to events rather than objects. They can refer to objects as well.
     
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    JamesM

    Senior Member
    Would not it be the same as "The patient was diagnosed with cancer" ? Here as well it's not the patient who is diagnosed with cancer but the patient's sickness is.
    The sickness is not diagnosed with cancer. :) That would mean that the cancer had cancer.

    In this case, the patient is diagnosed with cancer.

    "Miracle" is used a little loosely. I have heard people say, "After the accident the doctors said he would never move his legs again but he just completed a half-marathon this weekend. He's a walking miracle!"

    The miracle that he can walk at all is continuous, in this sense. For the mother whose baby was not expected to survive it is constant miracle that the baby is still alive.

    As owlman5 said, this is very common in everyday conversation.
     

    Mr.X Senior

    Senior Member
    Burmese & English (2nd Language)
    Thank JamesM.

    I was wrong in the sentence which you had refered.

    I think the correct phrase is :

    Would not it be the same as "The patient was diagnosed with cancer" ? Here as well it's not the patient who is diagnosed with cancer but the patient's sickness is diganosed as cancer.

    Is that correct?
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    No, I don't think so. The "with" here means the same as "as having", in my opinion: "The patient was diagnosed as having cancer". It might just be a convention, but it's the most common way I know of saying it.
     

    Mr.X Senior

    Senior Member
    Burmese & English (2nd Language)
    Thank again JamesM,

    Would you able to enlighten me one more time.

    I am consulting the OED, but I could not find any entry under "with" - preposation for "As having". Unless you are talking about "Having or Pocessing". I don't know , I might be wrong, "As having" has the same meaning as "Having or Possession" ? Am I missing some points here?
     
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    johndot

    Senior Member
    English - England
    You are quite right on both counts, Mr.X Senior.

    Technically an event is a miracle—and although a baby might be the result of that event, it, the baby, is not actually the miracle. However by extension the baby (or the man who now can run a marathon) personifies the miracle, and that is a popular concept which occurs throughout the world, in all cultures I would guess.

    Your second example I’m not so happy to pass off lightly. You are right that it is not the patient who is diagnosed (diagnose meaning “to identify”) but the illness, and the correct expression therefore should be “The patient’s illness has been diagnosed as XXX.”

    In your first example the baby personifies the miracle—which is fine. In the second the patient has been made to personify the illness, which is not fine, in my opinion.

    Sadly, I think it’s too late to reverse the trend.
     
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