My bank hit me with a huge fee

deltron

Senior Member
English (American)
Greetings and Happy 2020! I was just wondering if there's a German equivalent for "to hit someone with a huge fine/fee." It seems like "etwas gegen jdn. verhängen" could fit, but I don't know what would sound best for the "etwas":
-Meine Bank hat eine hohe Strafe gehen mich verhängt
-Meine Bank hat viele Bußgelder/Strafgelder gegen mich verhängt (???)
-Meine Bank hat ein höhes (???) Strafgeld/Bußgeld gegen mich verhängt

Other examples for context: The league hit him with a huge fine for taunting. If you don't return your rental car in a clean condition, you could be hit with a huge fee.

In general, is verhängen the right verb and how do you attach adjectives to Strafgeld/Bußgeld to indicate something like a huge/large/small/reasonable/unexpected fine?

Thanks for any suggestions!

Edit: fixed the gender of Bank
 
  • Frieder

    Senior Member
    'Verhängen' is what judges do in court. A bank can't do that.

    I'd say

    Meine Bank hat mir hohe Strafgebühren auferlegt (elevated)/aufgebrummt (colloquial).
    Meine Bank verlangt hohe Strafgebühren von mir (normal).
     

    deltron

    Senior Member
    English (American)
    Meine Bank hat mir hohe Strafgebühren auferlegt (elevated)/aufgebrummt (colloquial).
    Thanks, Frieder! Aufbrummen is a new verb for me.

    In general it's hard for me to grasp the concept of singular vs. plural in German for these kinds of situations. It sounds like "Diese Strafgebühren sind unfair" can either be "This fee is unfair" or "These fees are unfair." Is "Diese Strafgebühr ist unfair" actually wrong?
     
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