My bff and I usually dine out

supermarioutd

Senior Member
Persian
Hello to all,

Can a grown-up man or woman use BFF like this? :

My BFF and I usually dine out once a week.

Isn't it weird?

Is there another word I can use instead of BFF or bestie which is more grown-up like?
 
  • The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    It's not unusual for adult women to use BFF, though it's unlikely to be used by older women (or by men). It will always sound jocular.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    I often refer to a good friend as
    “my mate” but I think that’s probably unusual among grown women. I think we just use friend, I’ve certainly grown our of using the tag “best” for a friend. I’d definitely never use BFF (how do pronounce that?).
    Teenagers and young women seem to say “bestie” and “besties” for the group they socialise with.
     

    The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I often refer to a good friend as
    “my mate” but I think that’s probably unusual among grown women. I think we just use friend, I’ve certainly grown our of using the tag “best” for a friend. I’d definitely never use BFF (how do pronounce that?).
    [...]
    It's pronounced bee-eff-eff.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    Is there another expression used instead of best friend?
    "BFF" started around 1996 and got into dictionaries in 2010. It became common in social networks (online chat) and in smartphone chat. So those of us who became adults before 1996, and who don't do a lot of text chatting, never started using BFF.

    I don't remember any previous term. I don't think there was any need for a term, before text chat. "Best friend" is only 11 characters (or 2 syllables in speech). That is short enough for anything except phone texting:

    "How R U? R U OK? Is ur mom still mad? My BFF says Hi!"

    I'm sure a chat-expert could say that much more concisely. I don't know the abbreviations. And I don't use emoticonso_O
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    Talking about a 'best friend' sounds juvenile to me as a concept. A 'best friend' is what we had perhaps when we were in primary school. 'Bestie' is even worse. Does the first 'F' really stand for female?
    Then we grew up and realised that a woman can have several really good friends, each friendship having its special value, including friendships with men which might be limited to an occasional lunch or coffee, but of equal though slightly different value.

    I wonder what sort of woman uses these terms. Mindless wastes of skin, naming no names, although KK initials come to mind?

    I'd advise the learner not to use these abbreviations because presumably you do not want to give a false impression of yourself. The non-native speaker needs to have an idea of them. There's a host of language clues as to what a person is like: grammar and spelling mistakes of course, plus use of foul language. Forms of address are also clues. I could never be friends with people who are over-familiar, calling me 'hun' for example. Either they are disguising their true feelings or they are being patronising.

    (By the way, the usual* term is 'eat out' if you live together, or 'meet up for a meal' if you don't.
    * There are perhaps other valid expressions. That would be a separate question. :) )
     
    Last edited:

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    I've certainly come across it, although I don't personally use it, and I'm with those who say it sounds juvenile.

    That said, I see it's in Oxford Dictionaries, so I daresay in the fullness of time it'll come to be accepted as just another ordinary common colloquialism.
     
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