my blood felt their subtle violence as it had never felt frost or fire

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Irelia20150604

Senior Member
Chinese
The quotation comes from Charlotte Brontë – Jane Eyre (Chap. 26) | Genius

Quotation: My nerves vibrated to those low-spoken words as they had never vibrated to thunder—my blood felt their subtle violence as it had never felt frost or fire; but I was collected, and in no danger of swooning. I looked at Mr. Rochester: I made him look at me. His whole face was colourless rock: his eye was both spark and flint. He disavowed nothing: he seemed as if he would defy all things.

Context: the impediment “simply consists in the existence of a previous marriage. Mr. Rochester has a wife now living.”
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Hi everyone! I don’t quite understand the bold part. It’s fairly subtle. I try to interpret it as below. Is it correct?

Subtle => 11.11 Working imperceptibly or secretly, insidious.
Violence => something violent

The sentence => I felt the insidious and violent invasion of those words into my veins as (= in such a painful, torturing, annoying, distressful, etc., way that) I had never felt the invasion of frost or fire into my veins.
 
  • PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    I felt the insidious and violent invasion of those words into my veins (= in such a painful, torturing, annoying, distressful, etc., way that) and with a strength of feeling that I had never before felt into my veins even when I had felt cold displeasure or anger.
     

    Franco-filly

    Senior Member
    English - Southern England
    The sentence => I felt the insidious and violent invasion of those words into my veins as (= in such a painful, torturing, annoying, distressful, etc., way that) I had never felt the invasion of frost or fire into my veins
    :thumbsup:I think I'd say insidious but/yet violent to emphasize these sensations are contradictory.
     
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