My car gives good mileage . My car gives me good mileage.

< Previous | Next >

hectacon

Senior Member
Hindi
My car gives good mileage .

My car gives me good mileage.

Which are the subject and object in this sentence?
 
  • Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    According to the terminology I am accustomed to:

    In both sentences, 'my car' is the subject.

    In both sentences 'good mileage' is the direct object.

    In the second sentence, 'me' is the indirect object.​
     

    hectacon

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    According to the terminology I am accustomed to use:

    In both sentences, 'my car' is the subject.

    In both sentences 'good mileage' is the direct object.

    In the second sentence, 'me' is the indirect object.​
    Are both my and car subject here?. Now what can I write his cars gives/ give good mileage? and what is indirect object?
     
    Last edited:

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    Are both my and car subject here?. Now what can I write his cars gives/ give good mileage? and what is indirect object?
    'Car' by itself is the subject. 'My' describes the car. You may call it a 'modifier' or an 'adjective', or perhaps something else. I don't know what terms you use.

    Your more recent sentence works the same way:

    His cars give/get good mileage.
    Cars
    is the subject; mileage is the object.

    There is no indirect object.​
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    Just to underline joanvillafane's comment, we say it gets good mileage, not it gives good mileage.

    The fact that your car gets good mileage is considered a characteristic of the car, not a gift to you. :) Anyone driving the car would get relatively good mileage.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Alternatively, the whole phrase my car can be analysed as subject; and so if you write his car, her car or their car, they would still be subject.

    In grammar articles and possessive pronouns are called determiners. Here's the definition from our dictionary:
    de•ter•min•er/dɪˈtɝmənɚ/n.[countable]
    a word that comes before a noun or a noun phrase including the articles (a, an, and the), demonstratives (this, that, these, and those), possessives(my, your, his, her, our, their), as well as the following: all, both, half, several, some, any, no, each, every, enough, either, neither, much, many, more, most, little, less, least, few, what, whatever, which, whichever.
     

    hectacon

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    'Car' by itself is the subject. 'My' describes the car. You may call it a 'modifier' or an 'adjective', or perhaps something else. I don't know what terms you use.

    Your more recent sentence works the same way:

    His cars give/get good mileage.
    Cars
    is the subject; mileage is the object.

    There is no indirect object.​
    I am a bit confused . What I have understood is that, an object is one on which an action is performed. Now here on mileage what kind of action is being performed?
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    'Object' is a grammatical label. The range of meanings associated with an object is rather wide. It includes something that is acted upon, but it also includes something that comes about as a result of the action ('I drew a cat', 'I had a shower', 'I took a walk') or something that is passed on.
     

    hectacon

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    'Object' is a grammatical label. The range of meanings associated with an object is rather wide. It includes something that is acted upon, but it also includes something that comes about as a result of the action ('I drew a cat', 'I had a shower', 'I took a walk') or something that is passed on.
    I took a walk = I is the subject and walk is the object. I drew a cat = I is the subject and cat is the object. I had a shower= what is the object here?
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top