my class is composed by/of 20 pupils

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pepformance

Member
català (valencià)
I took a look on a thread, but I'm still doubting.

Which option is better?

my class is composed by/of 20 pupils.

thanks for your help
 
  • kayokid

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    Hello. I am not convinced that 'composed' is the correct verb here. I would say: My class consists of 20 pupils, or My class is made up of 20 pupils, or My class has 20 pupils (in it), or even more simply: There are 20 pupils in my class.
     

    pepformance

    Member
    català (valencià)
    thanks for your fast response!

    My class is comprised of 20 pupils could be another option?

    thanks again!
     

    jdenson

    Senior Member
    USA / English
    thanks for your fast response!

    My class is comprised of 20 pupils could be another option?

    thanks again!
    No, compose and comprise do not have the same meaning. The parts compose the whole and the whole comprises its parts.

    The United States comprises fifty states.
    The United States is composed of fifty states.
    Fifty states compose the United States.

    JD
     

    kayokid

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    No, compose and comprise do not have the same meaning. The parts compose the whole and the whole comprises its parts.

    The United States comprises fifty states.
    The United States is composed of fifty states.
    Fifty states compose the United States.

    JD
    There is a note in my dictionary (American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language) to this effect. It also states that 'is comprised of' is becoming more and more used and accepted. It sounds fine to me, personally.
     

    popckorn

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Mexican
    What about:

    "Plant 2 is composed/comprised/consists of 15,000 sq feet..."

    I lean towards is composed of which one is the most idomatic?

    The context is a description of the different facilities a manufacturing site has.
     

    JennyTW

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    I took a look on a thread, but I'm still doubting.

    Which option is better?

    my class is composed by/of 20 pupils.

    thanks for your help
    Although as we have seen, "composed" is not the best word to use here, I just wanted to comment on the prepositions. With the meaning you want, "of" would generally be the best preposition to use. ("It's composed of three parts"). If you use "by", the meaning of "composed" changes to "written" (of music), as in "this piece was composed by Mozart".
     

    aztlaniano

    Senior Member
    English (Aztlán, US sector)
    My class is composed by/ of 20 pupils.
    or
    My class is made up of 20 pupils.
    or
    There are 20 pupils in my class.
    Por cierto, "pupils" (en lugar de "students") se suele usar para la enseñanza primaria, es decir, para niños.

    "Plant 2 is composed/comprised/consists of 15,000 sq feet..."
    Plant 2 comprises 15,000 square feet
    Plant 2 has a total area of 15,000 ...
     

    FromPA

    Senior Member
    USA English
    No, "your class comprises 20 pupils, a teacher, etc."
    Kayokid's answers in #2 are all natural-sounding.
    Unfortunately, the dictionaries are caving in and recognizing the misuse of this word. Here's what Dictionary.com has:

    Idioms 4. be comprised of, to consist of; be composed of: The sales network is comprised of independent outlets and chain stores.

    The barbarians are through the gate.
     

    Wandering JJ

    Senior Member
    British English
    Unfortunately, the dictionaries are caving in and recognizing the misuse of this word. Here's what Dictionary.com has:

    Idioms 4. be comprised of, to consist of; be composed of: The sales network is comprised of independent outlets and chain stores.

    The barbarians are through the gate.

    Thank goodness the Oxford dictionaries have not yet accepted this usage: "...the construction comprise of, as in the property comprises of bedroom, bathroom, and kitchen, is regarded as incorrect."
    Copyright © 2013 Oxford University Press. All rights reserved

    We WR forum members must preserve the language! ☺
     

    donbeto

    Senior Member
    Eng (Canada)
    At least my beloved tfd.com acknowledges this:

    Usage Note:

    The traditional rule states that the whole comprises the parts and the parts compose the whole. In strict usage: The Union comprises 50 states. Fifty states compose (or constitute or make up) the Union. Even though careful writers often maintain this distinction, comprise is increasingly used in place of compose, especially in the passive: The Union is comprised of 50 states.
    The barbarians are through the gate.
    With only you (and is that Bernie Parent?) to stop them!:)
     
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