My cooking has been improving.

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tayzeena

Member
American English
Ciao a tutti,

How would I translate these two phrases?:

1. "My cooking has improved." --Meaning that my cooking is better than it used to be.
2. "My cooking has been improving." --Meaning that my cooking has improved, but is still in the process of improving.

Here's my attempt:
1. La mia cucina ha migliorato.
2. La mia cucina è stata migliorando.

I'm mostly just having trouble with translating (has/have) been + gerund.

Grazie in anticipo! :)
 
  • giginho

    Senior Member
    Italiano & Piemontese
    Ciao a tutti,

    How would I translate these two phrases?:

    1. "My cooking has improved." --Meaning that my cooking is better than it used to be.
    2. "My cooking has been improving." --Meaning that my cooking has improved, but is still in the process of improving.

    Here's my attempt:
    1. La mia cucina ha migliorato.
    2. La mia cucina è stata migliorando.

    I'm mostly just having trouble with translating (has/have) been + gerund.

    Grazie in anticipo! :)
    Ciao!

    Io direi

    "La mia cucina è migliorata" EX: la mia cucina è migliorata (molto) dopo le mie vacanze in Italia....you were in Italy for a period and you learn how to cook
    "La mia cucina sta migliorando" meaning that you're improving your cooking skills, maybe attending a course.
     

    gabbagabbahey

    Member
    italiano
    Io invece suggerirei:
    - Sono migliorata in cucina
    - Sto diventando più brava/abile a cucinare

    In Italian, the present participle is usually translated with "passato prossimo", as we're talking about something done in a recent past. On the contrary, when the action is still in a process, we use the gerund. Is it a bit clearer, now? :)
     

    GavinW

    Senior Member
    British English
    Ciao a tutti,

    How would I translate these two phrases?:

    1. "My cooking has improved." --Meaning that my cooking is better than it used to be.
    2. "My cooking has been improving." --Meaning that my cooking has improved, but is still in the process of improving.

    Here's my attempt:
    1. La mia cucina ha migliorato.
    2. La mia cucina è stata migliorando.

    I'm mostly just having trouble with translating (has/have) been + gerund.

    Grazie in anticipo! :)
    Actually, it's not a gerund, it's a present participle, in English, although it's correct to say that "migliorando" in a gerund in Italian.
    On a side note, I'd say the short answer to your question is that it is fundamentally difficult to show the difference between your two sentences in ordinary, day-to-day Italian. Prhaps the most common solution is to opt for the present continuous in Italian, and qualify it with an adverb of time, or adverbial phrase, to stress the continuous aspect of the action, eg: "Mia cucina sta migliorando di questi tempi".
    Interestingly, Spanish does have a tense construction which closely reflects the present perfect continuous (eg "sigue comendo", I believe). I would argue that Italian does not ("unfortunately", as they say).
    HTH
     
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