My fanny

Ariel123

Member
Español
Cómo se traduciría esta expresión? Sé que es vulgar. Sería algo así como "qué coño", como sorpresa?
 
  • Ariel123

    Member
    Español
    Gracias, Masood.
    El contexto es el siguiente: una mujer quiere comprar una casa pero no quiere presionar al vendedor. Entonces, le dice a su agente inmobiliaria:
    -I don't want to be pushy.
    A lo cual la agente le responde:
    -Pushy, my fanny! You're offering this man money.
     

    PichaPuerto

    Senior Member
    I doubt a British person would say that nowadays. There is an expression "My sweet fanny aunt" but probably old-fashioned.

    American and British English differ on the meaning of the word.

    In the context you put, it would mean "¡¡Qué va!!"
     
    Last edited:

    Darío Anselmo

    Senior Member
    COSTA RICA - Spanish
    El contexto es el siguiente: una mujer quiere comprar una casa pero no quiere presionar al vendedor. Entonces, le dice a su agente inmobiliaria:
    -I don't want to be pushy.
    A lo cual la agente le responde:
    -Pushy, my fanny! You're offering this man money.

    "-No quiero ser insistente..."
    "- ¿Cuál insistente?!" / "¡Ningún insistente!" / "Qué insistente ni qué ocho cuartos!"

    Eso es lo que se quiere decir. Es una expresión para deslegitimar lo de "insistente" ("pushy").
     

    terptime2011

    Member
    English -- America
    Though Chris K. you are not wrong about "fanny" being "ass" as well in this context I disagree with your interpretation of the expression.

    "My fanny" is a rather cutsie yet admittingly very old-fashioned way of saying "you wish!" or "yeah right!" or "impossible!"

    For example:

    -You owe me $10.

    -$10 my fanny! I owe you nothing.

    -----------------------

    - Me debes $10.

    - Imposible, no te debo nada.
     

    Chris K

    Senior Member
    English / US
    Though Chris K. you are not wrong about "fanny" being "ass" as well in this context I disagree with your interpretation of the expression.

    "My fanny" is a rather cutsie yet admittingly very old-fashioned way of saying "you wish!" or "yeah right!" or "impossible!"

    For example:
    -You owe me $10.
    -$10 my fanny! I owe you nothing.

    -----------------------
    - Me debes $10.
    - Imposible, no te debo nada.

    You're absolutely right that "My fanny!" as used in the original example is an expression of intense skepticism. I only wanted to correct skubidur's suggestion that "my fanny" = "my dear" and wasn't sure whether it was the metaphorical or the literal use of the word (as in "I fell on my fanny") that he or she was confused about.
     
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