My friend will pay

  • Yendred

    Senior Member
    Français - France
    French:

    Mon ami(e) va payer/régler
    or:
    C'est mon ami(e) qui va payer/régler


    [...]

    "Mein Freund bezahlt"
    According to my translator (sorry I don't speak German), this means "My friend pays/is paying" (present tense).
    Is present tense the common way to say it in German in this case?
     
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    TheCrociato91

    Senior Member
    Italian - Northern Italy
    Italian
    - Literal version
    Paga il mio amico/la mia amica
    - Non-literal versions related to paying the check/bill, which are understood if the context is clear enough
    Ci pensa il mio amico/la mia amica
    Se ne occupa il mio amico/la mia amica
    (Both roughly meaning "my friend will take care of it")
     

    Yendred

    Senior Member
    Français - France
    Could you use the future tense, mon ami paiera?
    Not in this case. "Mon ami va payer" tense is what we call futur proche (near future). It is used to talk about an event that will occur in a short time, which is the case when you pay the bill in a restaurant.
    "Mon ami paiera" would suggest that he will not pay this evening, but he will pay later, and this is not the intended meaning.

    Mon ami va payer is equivalent to the English My friend is going to pay, but it seems the common way is to say My friend will pay.
     
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    Perseas

    Senior Member
    Greek
    In Greek:
    Ο φίλος μου θα πληρώσει. (φίλος is masculine)
    Η φίλη μου θα πληρώσει. (φίλη is feminine).

    (Alternatively, you can change the word order: Θα πληρώσει ο φίλος/η φίλη μου).

    According to my translator (sorry I don't speak German), this means "My friend pays/is paying" (present tense).
    Is present tense the common way to say it in German in this case?
    Yes, but "Mein Freund wird bezahlen" is also in use.
    Present with reference to the future is one of the functions of present tense.
    canoonet - Verb: Tense: Present
     
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    Circunflejo

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Castilla
    Literally, it would be pagará mi amigo/a. But present tense works perfectly fine too: paga mi amigo/a.
     

    Frank78

    Senior Member
    German
    According to my translator (sorry I don't speak German), this means "My friend pays/is paying" (present tense).
    Is present tense the common way to say it in German in this case?
    Yes, it is. The only strict division between tenses in German is past and non-past.

    So for a future event you can say "Mein Freund bezahlt" (present tense) or "Mein Freund wird bezahlen" (future).
    We often use the present tense with an adverb of time for future events.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Mon ami va payer is equivalent to the English My friend is going to pay, but it seems the common way is to say My friend will pay.
    I would say “My friend is paying.”

    Palestinian Arabic:
    صاحبي راح يدفع (male friend)
    صاحبتي راح تدفع (female friend)
     

    Armas

    Senior Member
    Finnish
    Finnish: Ystäväni maksaa. Real-world non-bookish language: Mun kaveri maksaa.
    There are various other ways to express it. I've often heared something like Maksaja tulee perässä lit. "The payer comes behind".
     

    Zareza

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    Prietenul meu va plăti. = My friend will pay. (male friend)

    Prietena mea va plăti. = My friend will pay. (female friend)
     

    AndrasBP

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    Hungarian:
    A barátom fizet.

    A = the
    barát = friend
    -om = my
    fizet = pay (in the present tense, but it's more idiomatic here than the future)

    Real-world non-bookish language: Mun kaveri maksaa.
    Do you know the origin of "kaveri"?
    We use the word "haver" in colloquial Hungarian, which is a Yiddish loanword, ultimately from Hebrew.
    I didn't expect any of those in Finnish... :) Maybe through Russian?
     

    Armas

    Senior Member
    Finnish
    My etymological dictionary gives the Yiddish word as a possible source but says it's more likely that kaveri is a blend of kamraati (Swe. kamrat "mate; comrade") and toveri ("mate; comrade", Rus. това́рищ). I assume that's because there's no explanation for how the Yiddish word could have reached us.
     

    merquiades

    Senior Member
    English (USA Northeast)
    Not in this case. "Mon ami va payer" tense is what we call futur proche (near future). It is used to talk about an event that will occur in a short time, which is the case when you pay the bill in a restaurant.
    "Mon ami paiera" would suggest that he will not pay this evening, but he will pay later, and this is not the intended meaning.

    Mon ami va payer is equivalent to the English My friend is going to pay, but it seems the common way is to say My friend will pay.
    Yes, the usage is the opposite in the 2 languages.
     

    Awwal12

    Senior Member
    Russian
    How do you say "My friend will pay" in your language?
    [...]
    I suppose the context is a dialogue in the bar or something like that (because it depends).
    I'd propose "платить будет мой друг" ~[pɬɐ'tʲidʲ.'budʲɪt.'mo̞ɪ̯.'dɾuk], lit. "to-be-paying will-be my friend" (the word order is reversed compared to the "default" sentence where the friend would be a topic). Still, it normally depends at least on the friend's gender (cf. "моя подруга" [mɐ'ja.pɐ'dɾugə] - my female friend).
     

    Awwal12

    Senior Member
    Russian
    What does the по- prefix brings in terms of nuance? In other words what's the difference with "моя друга"? (is it correct Russian yet?)
    No, there is no word "друга" (outside of the gen.sg. form of "друг") in Russian, only "друг" and "подруга". The meanings of /po-/ are diverse and it isn't productive with nouns in modern Russian to the top of it. I can just guess that it's a back-formation from "подружка" (since -k- may have a diminutive meaning as well as participate in general word formation), from v. "подружиться" ("to make friends", where /po-/, as it sometimes happens, marks a fully completed activity).

    P.S.: "Друг" may be used towards females as well, although then it will be marked (~"a real friend") and won't generally suit the context. On the other hand, "подру́га" is partly ambiguous ("a female friend"; "a girlfriend").
     
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