''My ice cream is finished'': North American English Equivalent

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Hello everyone,

I'd like to know the North American English equivalents to "finished" in "my ice cream is finished".

Anna: Daddy, my ice cream is finished.
John(daddy): Your ice cream is already finished? I'll buy some more.

Anna: Daddy, my ice cream___________.
John(daddy): Your ice cream is already_________? I'll buy some more.

Meaning intended: have no more left to eat, drink.


Thank you in advance!
 
  • Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I've eaten all the ice cream. (I'm a fat little pig!)
    The ice cream is all gone.
    There's no more ice cream.
    We're out of ice cream.
    There are probably quite a few more ways to say this. Did you have something more specific in mind? What do you mean by "my ice cream" - a single frozen treat or a whole gallon or ...?
     

    lucas-sp

    Senior Member
    English - Californian
    I think we would either say "My ice cream is [all] gone" as Myridon suggested or "I finished [all] my ice cream."

    I'm a little confused by you asking for the "equivalent" to this, because I would suspect that, even in BE, "My ice cream is finished" would mean "My ice cream is done, i.e. its preparation period is over and it is now ready to eat." It sounds like "I've finished cooking the ice cream," not "I've finished eating the ice cream."
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    I'm a little confused by you asking for the "equivalent" to this, because I would suspect that, even in BE, "My ice cream is finished" would mean "My ice cream is done, i.e. its preparation period is over and it is now ready to eat." It sounds like "I've finished cooking the ice cream," not "I've finished eating the ice cream."
    :thumbsup:
    Whether it was a bowlful or a cone/cornet/99, British Anna would say I've finished my ice cream:)
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Whether it was a bowlful or a cone/cornet/99, British Anna would say I've finished my ice cream:)
    Minor point: If it was a bowlful (or a single treat from an entire box), Daddy might not need to buy more. Would Anna necessarily know that "her" "ice cream" was the last ice cream (or the last of the ice cream).
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Minor point: If it was a bowlful (or a single treat from an entire box), Daddy might not need to buy more. Would Anna necessarily know that "her" "ice cream" was the last ice cream (or the last of the ice cream).
    Well, to be fair to Anna (and to Daddy, I suppose), Anna isn't saying I've finished my ice cream ~ buy me some more before I die of inanition. It's only Daddy who brings up the subject of buying more. Presumably Anna's unspoken thought is ... and I want some more, rather than ... and I'm thoroughly suffonsified. Maybe Anna is that type of little girlchild who would go into tantrum mode if deprived of ice cream for more than five minutes at a time ... (Erm ... I've forgotten what the point of this post was, if there was one.)
     

    lucas-sp

    Senior Member
    English - Californian
    I know this will drift off-topic, but just notice the difference between "The ice cream's finished" (in reference to this ice cream supply which we are all using) and "My ice cream's finished" (in reference to my personal amount of ice cream taken from a common supply). I think that's why your original sentence with "my" sounded a little odd to me.
     
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