My name is "....". [name in introductions]

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Hiden

Senior Member
japanese
I’ve recently read that English speakers do not normally state your full name when introducing themselves to someone:

(1) My name is Hide Matsui.

The book says that this is old-fashion. Is that true?

I often hear James Bond state his full name in his movies:

(2) My name is Bond, James Bond.

Hide
 
  • Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    I’ve recently read that English speakers do not normally state your full name when introducing themselves to someone. The book says that this is old-fashioned. Is that true?
    No, it's not true. Please tell us your source (book title and author); please add a link if the text is online.
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    It depends on the situation, but in many cases I would give my full name.

    What situation do you have in mind? Introducing yourself to someone at a party? Speaking up in a public meeting? Or something else?

    (James Bond's way of introducing himself is distinctive. If you follow that pattern, people are likely to think you are imitating him as a joke. On the other hand, there may be social situations in which this is the form people use.)

    Cross-posted.
     

    waltern

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    You will hear people introduce themselves both ways (first name only/first and last name) - it depends on the formality of the situation, the age of the speaker, etc.

    (The "Bond, James Bond" line is a catchphrase strongly associated with the character - it is not something you will often hear in real life.)
     

    roxcyn

    Senior Member
    USA
    American English [AmE]
    It depends on the context. If I'm in an interview, I will state my full name. If it's a casual environment, I might just say my first name.

    Examples:
    See Eminem's song "My name is." > "My name is Slim Shady." (See, he uses his nickname, no last name at all)
    However, take a salesman (real estate for example), they introduce themselves by first and last name.
    Then a teacher will introduce himself or herself by last name only.
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    [...]
    http://getnews.jp/archives/446141


    It says that if you say "My name is Hide Matsui" it sounds as if you were Samural or something.

    Hide
    I don't understand the Japanese writing, unfortunately. However, in the cartoon where someone says he's Kengo Takahashi, and the other one thinks he's a samurai, maybe the joke is that he thinks that anyone with a Japanese name must be a samurai. Is that possible?

    Added: It is fine to add a link when you also tell us in the post what's behind the link, as you did. :)
     

    Hiden

    Senior Member
    japanese
    I don't understand the Japanese writing, unfortunately. However, in the cartoon where someone says he's Kengo Takahashi, and the other one thinks he's a samurai, maybe the joke is that he thinks that anyone with a Japanese name must be a samurai. Is that possible?

    Added: It is fine to add a link when you also tell us in the post what's behind the link, as you did. :)

    Thank you for your insight, Cagey. Yes, maybe you are right. The cartoon only shows us a casual/informal situation, where people tend to introduce themselves only by first name. I think that the writer should have taken into consideration a formal situation, where “My name is [a full name]” is more often used. I agree that it depends on the situation.
    Once again thanks everone!

    Hide
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    I would only add that that the scene where two young children meet and give only first names looks quite natural to me. In my experience, though, adults normally give their full names.
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    It sounds a bit old-fashioned to me to say "My name is.....": I'd expect nowadays to hear just "I'm ....."
    As far as full name vs first name goes, I disagree with Parla in post #2: in my experience it requires a fairly formal setting to use both.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    It depends on the context. If I'm in an interview, I will state my full name. If it's a casual environment, I might just say my first name.
    I agree. It's difficult to give a blanket statement.

    This morning, I was involved with a radio roadshow where people gave comments on an issue. They just used their given names (= forenames, first names) ('I'm Max', 'My name's Andy'). For me, this is also normal in a social activity - introducing yourself in a gym, in a dance class, in church.

    There are also instances when I just give my surname (= last name, family name) - when I'm making a booking for a taxi or for a restaurant or when I'm dealing with salespeople.
     
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