My name is still John or My name is still "John?"

urbaneast

New Member
English: American
Typically, in English, when one is discussing a word as a word, quotation marks are used around it. For example,

"He used the word 'layoff,' which scared me."

However, are is it correct to use quotation marks around proper nouns used words? For example,

"I dislike the name 'Google.' The company should come up with a different name for itself."

or

"My name remains 'John,' no matter how many nicknames my friends try to give me."

Thanks very much.
 
  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    It's not necessary: normally appositions don't have to have any special punctuation, as in the Emperor Napoleon, the train The Flying Scotsman, the opera Carmen, the game hopscotch, and so on. The name John is a kind of name, so that should be enough. With other linguistic expressions, however, you need to mark them off to stop them looking like an ordinary part of the sentence: to distinguish a word puzzle from the word 'puzzle'.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Hi urbaneast - welcome to the forums!

    I might, conceivably, and in some contexts, put quotes around a trade name such as Google. But I can't imagine writing My name is "Loob", rather than My name is Loob. This might have something to do with how I identify myself. In which case your question may well be more philosophical than grammatical....:cool:

    Perhaps if you told us why you were asking the question we'd be better able to help?
     

    urbaneast

    New Member
    English: American
    Perhaps if you told us why you were asking the question we'd be better able to help?
    I was just writing an email with a sentence similar to one of the examples. My intuition was that quotation marks were unnecessary, but I just wanted to make sure.

    Thanks for the quick response.
     
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