My name written in English / My name in English is written

sb70012

Senior Member
Azerbaijani/Persian
My name written in English is Ren Yitao.
My name in English is written Ren Yitao

Hello,
They are self-made. Would you please be kind enough to tell me which is natural?

Thank you
 
  • sb70012

    Senior Member
    Azerbaijani/Persian
    "Ren Yitao is the Latin transliteration of my name."
    Thanks for answering.
    But your sentence is a little awkward to me. Because the word [Latin] was usually used in ancient literature books and stories not modern English. I don't know, maybe I don't understand it very well.
     
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    Smauler

    Senior Member
    British English
    I don't think I'd use that, morior_invictus.

    Both the originals are fine.

    My name is written in English Ren Yitao.
    My name is in English written Ren Yitao.

    These are also fine, and I'd possibly prefer that last one over all others, since it implies that it is not a literal translation.
     

    sb70012

    Senior Member
    Azerbaijani/Persian
    What about this one Smauler:

    My name written in English is Ren Yitao.

    Is that natural to you too?
     

    Linkway

    Senior Member
    British English
    I prefer:

    I write my name in English as Ren Yitao.


    I would be very reluctant to use phrases like "the Latin transliteration is" unless I was sure it was correct to do so.

    Why?

    Because:

    --- we do not know what language the name was originally written in;

    --- when you transliterate from Arabic, Chinese, Korean, and even Russian, there is usually NOT one single possible version (so don't say "the" transliteration, perhaps "a" transliteration);

    --- transliterations are not simply into "Latin characters"; the exact form used will depend on the language context you are going to use that transliteration in. Although the former soviet leader's name may be transliterated as "Nikita Sergeyevich Khrushchev" for English readers, in Germany it is transliterated as "Nikita Sergejewitsch Chruschtschow" --- both are using Latin characters. In France, it would be "Nikita Sergueïevitch Khrouchtchev".

    --- the context may need "everyday English" rather than pseudo-academic expressions that most people would not understand and most of those that did, would/should not agree with.


    For these reasons, I prefer a simple and accurate statement like: "I write my name in English as ..."


     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    I think Morior is referring the type of characters used for the writing. Upper case western scripts typically use characters referred to as Roman or Latin (wiki) script/type. These are used to distinguish them from Cyrillic, Greek or Chinese characters etc. English is not the only language to use "Roman" characters, so the question is a little less specific than it might be assumed at first glance. If sb had asked about writing in German or French (in the appropriate forum of course:D), I suspect the answer would be the same with regards to the characters used. However, the question seems focused on the word order in English of almost everything but the name:D We could substitute "Roman characters" for the word "English" in the original sentences and then follow the suggestions as to the best word order.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    I didn't actually recommend it - just explaining for sb's benefit:D - although "Roman letters" might get through to a few more English speakers.

    My name is in English written Ren Yitao.

    These are also fine, and I'd possibly prefer that last one over all others, since it implies that it is not a literal translation.
    The underlined one sounds awkward to me - splitting the "is written" with "in English" sounds more like German word order.
     

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Why not simply write My name is Ren Yitao? This name is written in a script, which uses Latin or Roman letters, certainly not English.

    It's like saying that the name in English of the Chinese President is Xi Jinping, which is just nonsense. The script is called pinyin, not English!

    PS Ren Yitao appears to be a Chinese name.
     
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    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    I was replying to your question in #11.:confused:

    (And yes, I see we are both native English speakers. That's why I was surprised with the word order you had found most preferable).
     
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    morior_invictus

    Senior Member
    Slovak
    I think Morior is referring the type of characters used for the writing. Upper case western scripts typically use characters referred to as Roman or Latin (wiki) script/type. These are used to distinguish them from Cyrillic, Greek or Chinese characters etc. English is not the only language to use "Roman" characters, so the question is a little less specific than it might be assumed at first glance.
    This name is written in a script, which uses Latin or Roman letters, certainly not English.
    :thumbsup: :thumbsup:
    --- transliterations are not simply into "Latin characters
    They are (or at least should be). Transliterations are graphemic conversions of scripts as opposed to transcriptions that might fit your Khrushchev example. I also used the definite article as I was referring to the specific writing system (the Latin script)(That does not, however, mean that I am a reliable source as far as articles go. :) I am not.).
    --- the context may need "everyday English" rather than pseudo-academic expressions that most people would not understand and most of those that did, would/should not agree with.
    Most native English speakers will not know what Latin characters refer to, so mentioning them will only alienate or confuse them, both of which you do not want to do.
    I agree wholeheartedly with both of you. My post was not a recommendation or an advice sb should act upon but only a suggestion. As long as sb’s sentence communicates the desired message (which it does even if it reads "in English" which I personally would not use as I said above), everything is OK*. There are more important and nicer things in life than quibbling over whether or not his sentence is correct other than grammatically and trying to assert one’s truth as the only truth that is why I did not do that and will never do. As I have learned here lots of things from all of you, I am trying to repay it somehow and since I can’t do that as far as English is concerned, I can only offer my knowledge from areas other than English (if only for momentary reflection) and of course, guide other learners if I can. I am convinced that that one sentence in my post #2 did no harm to this thread. It just offered an opinion that anyone reading this thread may or may not identify themselves with. That was my only intention. I don’t need to have the last word here (it might have been partly true when I joined this forum but it is no longer the case). Good relationships are more important for me than arguing over unimportant and superficial things. I hesitated over whether or not to contribute to this thread with another post and I am doing it only to dispel any doubts about my good intentions in the post #2 as I am not very happy with the response it elicited.

    * I must, however, say that I like e2e’s suggestion the most. (My name is Ren Yitao.)
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    I think the conventional way of expressing this is to say that the 'romanised form of the name is Ren Yitao'. Pinyin is romanised Chinese just like Romaji is romanised Japanese.
     
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