My neighborhood's supermarket / My neighborhood supermarket

jstrano

Member
Spanish
Hello! I was wondering what the correct answer to this sentence was. It is merely a sentence to help me understand the rule, so there isn't any context backing it up. Here are the choices:

My neighborhood's supermarket has all I need.

My neighborhood supermarket has all I need.

As I understand it, since the neighborhood "possesses" the supermarket, and given that neighborhood is not an animal or human being, the correct answer should be without an apostrophe...

HOWEVER

I was looking at this thread: Is it car's door or car door?
Where it is claimed that it may indeed be possible for an apostrophe to be correctly placed on a noun "possessing" another noun (i.e, the car's door). It is then claimed both options are correct.

I did some research on my own and found a blog post claiming otherwise: specifically that "The car's door" is incorrect and it should be said like "The car door".

I am in awe because I don't know what to think... and you may think it is not cause for concern but I have to teach a lesson on this soon and this unexpected question has come up... ! Please help me out!
 
  • The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    "My neighborhood supermarket" is probably what we would use. We don't really think of a neighborhood as being able to "possess" a store.

    There is often some grey area where either form is considered possible, at least by some speakers.
     

    jstrano

    Member
    Spanish
    Hello. I have another question regarding the same topic.

    When you indicate possession, you can use either:

    "The colour of his eyes" or "His eye(s?) colour"

    but here things change:

    "The girl of my dreams" (but in the noun+noun form this changes to the singular "My dream girl")

    "My neighborhood supermarket" is probably what we would use. We don't really think of a neighborhood as being able to "possess" a store.

    There is often some grey area where either form is considered possible, at least by some speakers.

    I've found one exception:

    The world's end.
     

    The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Hello. I have another question regarding the same topic.

    When you indicate possession, you can use either:

    "The colour of his eyes" or "His eye(s?) colour"

    but here things change:

    "The girl of my dreams" (but in the noun+noun form this changes to the singular "My dream girl")
    [...]

    We can say "the colour of his eyes" or "his eye colour"; in the latter case we use the singular. Likewise, "the girl of my dreams / my dream girl."

    "The world's end" is treated by us as a truer possessive than either of the above, so we can use the Saxon genitive (or use "the end of the world").
     
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