my parents are car dealers

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Silver

Senior Member
Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
Hi,

My student's writing an introduction about herself. Her mom is working as a car saleswoman while her father a car salesman in the same firm, can she say:

Both my parents are car dealers.

Thanks a lot

I looked up "car dealer" and I found some threads, but I need your confirmation.
 
  • Barque

    Banned
    Tamil
    Her mom is working as a car saleswoman while her father a car salesman in the same firm
    They could be called dealers if they own that firm. Otherwise, they are salespeople working for a car dealer.

    dealer (WR dictionary, underlining and insertion of article mine): a person who buys and sells articles without altering their condition; [a] trader or merchant, esp. a wholesaler:I got a dealer's discount on this coat.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    In American English you definitely have to be the owner to be called a car dealer. The way we say it is "He owns a car dealership." = He owns a business that sells cars. We don't call him a car dealer, we say he owns a dealership.

    The people who work for him are sales people. In the old days, when those were almost always men, you could say he was a car salesman. Or in some cases, a used car salesman. But nowadays that term isn't used so much.
     

    Barque

    Banned
    Tamil
    Is it just me, or has there been a significant increase lately in answers specifying they're from AmE/BE perspectives?:D I thought the language was more often uniform than not.

    OP: What's a steak?
    A: A slice of meat.
    B: A slice of meat in southern England.
    C: In the Midwest, it can only mean a slice of meat.
    D: The same here in California.
    A: Holy cow! What a coincidence!:D
     
    Last edited:

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Well, I think this is one of those cases where culture comes into it, and that's why it's specified. The car buying process owes a lot to local conditions, so you never know what you don't know. You only know what you do know.:)

    And general automotive terminology varies quite a lot between the two, as we all know.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    What does "steak" with no context have to do with the meaning of "dealer" in the context of selling cars? This forum regularly and frequently reveals regional differences in usage. It is easy to see how somebody whose first language is not English might mistakenly think that a dictionary definition of "dealer" might include a car salesman. A definition, for example, that says "trader", which means a person who trades. Is selling cars trading?
     

    Barque

    Banned
    Tamil
    What does "steak" with no context have to do with the meaning of "dealer" in the context of selling cars?
    Dealers have to eat too.:D

    No, steaks don't have anything to do with the OP's question, I agree. It was a joke. I can see how you might have thought it was directed at you and Kentix personally, so "Sorry" to both of you, but it wasn't - I posted because I have noticed a whole lot of posts recently that specify (without always having to, in my humble opinion), "This is what we say in AmE", often followed by "In BE too", and vice versa, and your posts reminded me of them.
     
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