my queries puzzled, but did not draw her out

Irelia20150604

Senior Member
Chinese
The context comes from Jane Eyre Chapter 11

his was all the account I got from Mrs. Fairfax of her employer and mine. There are people who seem to have no notion of sketching a character, or observing and describing salient points, either in persons or things: the good lady evidently belonged to this class; my queries puzzled, but did not draw her out. Mr. Rochester was Mr. Rochester in her eyes; a gentleman, a landed proprietor—nothing more: she inquired and searched no further, and evidently wondered at my wish to gain a more definite notion of his identity.
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Hi everyone! I don't quite understand the bold part. Does it mean "my queries puzzled her rather than elicited information from her" ?
 
  • PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    "my queries puzzled her, however they were not enough/sufficient to elicit any [more] information from her"
     

    Irelia20150604

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    :D Thank you for your explanation. I almost understand it now.

    my queries puzzled her, however they were not enough/sufficient to elicit any [more] information from her
    I have a little question: I'm not sure about the logical link between "my queries puzzled her" and "...elicits information from her". I guess it's easier to elicit information from a puzzled person than a clear-minded one. However, my queries still fails to do so, in spite of the puzzlement. Is it correct? :confused:
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    No.

    Jane wants to know all about Mr Rochester's character (what sort of a man he is.) However, Mrs Fairfax is not very good at giving the information that Jane wants - Mrs Fairfax does not know how to describe someone's character. Mrs Fairfax's attempts to do this (i) leave Mrs Fairfax confused as to exactly what Jane wants to know and (ii) leave Jane without any real information about Mr Rochester.
     

    Irelia20150604

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Mrs Fairfax's attempts to do this (i) leave Mrs Fairfax confused as to exactly what Jane wants to know and (ii) leave Jane without any real information about Mr Rochester.
    Hmmm.... :confused: I'd say "and" here is more understandable to me than "but (on the contrary, yet, etc.)". The logical link confused me a little.
     
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