My rescue I abandoned, <as such>, altogether.

park sang joon

Senior Member
Korean
The narrator recalls his childhood.
He was forced to work for his own living for Mr. Murdstone's friend Mr. Quinion at London by his stepfather.
He lodges at Mr.Micawber's and goes to his work Murdstone and Grinby's.

My rescue from this kind of existence I considered quite hopeless, and abandoned, as such, altogether. I can solemnly convinced that I never for one hour was reconciled to it, or was otherwise than miserably unhappy, but I bore it, and even to Peggotty, partly for the love of her and partly for shame, never in any letter (though many passed between use) revealed the truth.
[David Copperfield by Charles Dickens]
I'd like to know what "as such" means here.
Thank you in advance for your help.
 
  • Rescue 'as such' means some obvious form of rescue (e.g. people coming to aid him). Change of circumstance etc. might result in an improvement. Or maybe the one oppressing him would decide to go away on a long trip. Etc. Or die.

    ADDED: In light of Velisarius' postings below, I think that the above analysis is not quite accurate. In simple terms, "A rescue was hopeless and as such (hopeless), abandoned."
     
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    park sang joon

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Thank you, Bennymix, for your very kind answer. :)
    Then, I was wondering if "as such" is an adjectival phrase meaning "like such."
     
    If I say, "This recipe does not use potatoes as such, merely potato flour" then 'as such is adjectival.

    However,
    Starting with
    My rescue I considered hopeless, and abandoned, as such, altogether.

    Moving to
    ==>I considered my rescue hopeless and abandoned as such.

    Can we move to

    ==?I considered my rescue as such hopeless and abandoned.

    IF SO then it's adjectival.

    ==
    As Velisarius points out below, 'abandoned' parallels 'considered' not 'hopeless.'

    The tentative 'adjectival' conclusion does not stand up, as least as following from the analysis.
     
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    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    My rescue from this kind of existence I considered quite hopeless, and abandoned, as such, altogether.

    More precisely, this is how I read it:
    I considered my rescue quite hopeless, and I completely abandoned it (since I regarded it) as (being) hopeless.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    My rescue from this kind of existence I considered quite hopeless, and abandoned, as such, altogether.

    More precisely, this is how I read it:
    I considered my rescue quite hopeless, and I completely abandoned it (since I regarded it) as (being) hopeless.
    Precisely. :thumbsup:
     
    Very persuasive! I had a problem with 'abandoned' which you have solved.

    So is 'as such' adjectival?


    My rescue from this kind of existence I considered quite hopeless, and abandoned, as such, altogether.

    More precisely, this is how I read it:
    I considered my rescue quite hopeless, and I completely abandoned it (since I regarded it) as (being) hopeless.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    So is 'as such' adjectival?
    I'm glad you are persuaded, benny. I don't know how to classify "as such". "Such" refers back to an adjective. Adverb perhaps? Compare with this definition of "so" as an adverb:

    "So: used instead of repeating an adjective that has already been mentioned:
    She's reasonable to work with - more so than I was led to believe.
    He's fairly bright - well, certainly more so than his brother."

    so Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
     
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