My sidewalk garden - 2019

AdrienDeLaChicago

Senior Member
Hello, everyone. I want to make a quick video of my sidewalk garden. This is the area that is typically just grass. But I ripped it out and put flowers and shrubs. I want the title of this thread to be the title of my video. Would someone please help me translate into Portuguese, please?

Would it be....

"Meu jardim na calçada - 2019"

Thank you for any input,

Adrien
 
  • Alisson Pereira

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Brazil
    Sorry, I saw some images on Google with your title and that seemed more like ''O caminho do meu jardim''.
     

    AdrienDeLaChicago

    Senior Member
    Wow, that looks a lot different. Now I'm a bit confused. The sad thing is I can speak Spanish quite fluently but Portuguese is a whole other ball of wax. It is so different looking and sounding to me. Even though it's a romance language (along with Spanish).
     

    AdrienDeLaChicago

    Senior Member
    When I translate the second one it says in English, "The path in my garden." That's not what I'm trying to say.

    What I'm trying to say is basically "My garden" which looks like it would be "Meu jardim." But it's a garden that is public and is part of the street or sidewalk. Hym, this is perplexing.
     

    Carfer

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Portugal
    If you are targeting European Portuguese, you may translate it by 'os canteiros da minha rua'. 'Canteiro' is a small square or rectangular stretch of soil with flowers and small shrubs. 'Sidewalk' translates as 'passeio' in European Portuguese, so you can also say 'os canteiros do meu passeio' but 'da minha rua' sounds much more natural.
     

    Guigo

    Senior Member
    Português (Brasil)
    I'd say that Adrien is more interested in spotting the garden (his) than the sidewalk then I'd go with his first try: "Meu jardim na calçada - 2019".
     

    AdrienDeLaChicago

    Senior Member
    Yes, Guigo. It is specifically "my" garden that I'd like to showcase in the video. However, the actual area that I planted is not specifically my property. It is public city property that I improved. Thank you, everyone, for all this great input.


    Not sure if the Portuguese spoken in Africa is closer to that spoken in Portugal. But I'm playing a song in the background for my video by a well known singer from Africa named Cesária Évora. I don't know what she's saying in her songs but her music is beautiful. :p
     

    Guigo

    Senior Member
    Português (Brasil)
    Yes, Guigo. It is specifically "my" garden that I'd like to showcase in the video. However, the actual area that I planted is not specifically my property. It is public city property that I improved. Thank you, everyone, for all this great input.
    Not sure if the Portuguese spoken in Africa is closer to that spoken in Portugal. But I'm playing a song in the background for my video by a well known singer from Africa named Cesária Évora. I don't know what she's saying in her songs but her music is beautiful. :p
    Well, if it's public then it's yours too. Am I right? :)

    Which song by Cesária Évora? Some of her songs are sung in Capeverdian creole, actually based on Portuguese but difficult to be understood unless you have some kind of explanation or translation. Anyway if the song is the famed "Sodade" you may leave as it is, nevermind.
     

    Carfer

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Portugal
    Cesária sings in Cape Verdian Portuguese creole which regular Portuguese speakers don't understand either.
    As to your title, I'm afraid that 'o meu jardim' doesn't clearly imply that you planted it. It's a cultural issue because we are not used to people using public domain for their own purposes at their own discretion, at least legally (it's illegal actually. It's up to the city services to take care of that). So, 'o meu jardim' or 'a minha rua' would probably be understood as the garden nearby and the street where you live.

    P.S. post stuck and delayed because of network issues. Sorry if it partly duplicates Guigo post.
     
    Last edited:

    Ari RT

    Senior Member
    Português - Brasil
    As for Brazilian Portuguese:
    If you mean to stress YOUR flowers, YOUR work, then take Guigo's suggestion "meu jardim na calçada". Carfer's remark also applies to Brazilian PT, it sounds like you're setting fences around something that should be public domain. So unkind. But it depends on context. Maybe you are complaining about the lack of care by the city.
    One dot below could be "minha calçada florida". It's usual to call "minha" the portion of sidewalk in front of your house and it doesn't imply property. The problem here is no reference to your work.
    "Flores na minha rua" is even better. "Minha rua" is the street where I live. Absolutely no property implied.
    If you feel poetic, "meu caminho de flores", "flores no meu caminho".
    What about "flores que eu plantei na calçada"? It makes it clear enough that it was you who improved the space and it doesn't seem like you're fencing it. If you want to "poke" the municipality, write EU in capital letters. Above all, it's a hundred per cent true.
     

    Alisson Pereira

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Brazil
    Adrien, I'm curious. Which one will you choose? As everybody is putting on their ideas, I'm gonna put my idea on too.
    Taking your picture in mind.
    ''Meu ''canto'' florido''. Why?
    Canto==> CANTeiro. Do you see?

    In addition, it seems nobody cares about that, but you do.
     

    AdrienDeLaChicago

    Senior Member
    As for Brazilian Portuguese:
    If you mean to stress YOUR flowers, YOUR work, then take Guigo's suggestion "meu jardim na calçada".
    Guigo's suggestion is the same that I offered in my original post.

    .....it sounds like you're setting fences around something that should be public domain. So unkind.
    I didn't fence off any public property. Don't worry, I wasn't being unkind.

    Adrien, I'm curious. Which one will you choose? As everybody is putting on their ideas, I'm gonna put my idea on too.
    Taking your picture in mind.
    ''Meu ''canto'' florido''. Why?
    Canto==> CANTeiro. Do you see?

    In addition, it seems nobody cares about that, but you do.
    Hi, Alisson.

    I think I will go with Guigo's (and my) suggestion simply to emphasize that it was my effort to create the garden.

    As far as the song I was going to choose by Cesária Évora I really liked the melody to this song:

    Desilusão dum amdjer

    I had no idea what she was singing about but I just translated the title of that song and it means "disappointment of a woman.":oops: I had no idea. I guess that would be a ridiculous song to use since I want to show beautiful flowers in bloom. Not knowing the meaning of the song it just sounded so tranquil and I really like the tempo and melody. But I guess it's a bit sad and depressing? :(
     

    Archimec

    Senior Member
    Portugal, portuguese
    So, you are increasing the “sidewalk appeal” of your property…

    O “sidewalk side” duma casa, em português corrente, é a frente da casa, e a minha sugestão seria O meu (novo) jardim na frente da casa, ou O meu jardim 2019 na frente da casa.
     

    FriendViseu

    New Member
    Portuguese (Portugal)
    Hello, everyone. I want to make a quick video of my sidewalk garden. This is the area that is typically just grass. But I ripped it out and put flowers and shrubs. I want the title of this thread to be the title of my video. Would someone please help me translate into Portuguese, please?

    Would it be....

    "Meu jardim na calçada - 2019"

    Thank you for any input,

    Adrien
    Hello, Adrien. My suggestion: "Meu jardim, meu passeio"... "My garden, my sidewalk"
    In Portuguese of Portugal...
    I liked all the posts and contributions to translate what you have in mind (in English) to the correlated thought in Portuguese...and that's one simple and short way to do it, I think...
     
    Last edited:
    < Previous | Next >
    Top