My sunglasses fell off on/to the ground

Nataaaan

Senior Member
Portuguese - Brazil
Hello everybody, I would like to know which one is correct to say. For example:

"My sunglasses fell off on the ground"
"My sunglasses fell off to the ground"
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Do you really need to use off and to the ground, Nataaaan? I expected to read this version: My sunglasses fell off. Or this one: My sunglasses fell to the ground.

    If you need both off and to/on the ground for some reason, I prefer the second sentence. It might make more sense to use onto in the sentence: My sunglasses fell off and onto the ground.
     
    Last edited:

    Nataaaan

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Brazil
    Do you really need to use off and to the ground, Nataaaan? I expected to read this version: My sunglasses fell off. Or this one: My sunglasses fell to the ground.

    If you need both off and to/on the ground for some reason, I prefer the second sentence. It might make more sense to use onto in the sentence: My sunglasses fell off and onto the ground.
    Thank you!! I just got confused about the preposition. If my glasses were on my face before falling, could I say "my glasses fell to the ground" without using the word "off" ?
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    You're welcome.

    I just got confused about the preposition. If my glasses were on my face before falling, could I say "my glasses fell to the ground" without using the word "off" ?
    Yes, you could. You don't have to mention the fact that they also fell off your face. Or you could say My sunglasses fell off. People will probably assume that they fell to the floor or the ground.
     

    Nataaaan

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Brazil
    You're welcome.


    Yes, you could. You don't have to mention the fact that they also fell off your face. Or you could say My sunglasses fell off. People will probably assume that they fell to the floor or the ground.
    Sorry it's me again here.
    I did not want to post a new question because I have a question about the same context, for example:
    If I'm talking about a person, could I say "he fell" or "he fell to/on the ground" ?
    For example: "Don't walk too fast or you can fell/fell to the ground/fell on the ground"
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Yes. We assume when a person falls that the fall is to the ground (or floor).
    Don't walk too fast. You might fall.
    It doesn't matter whether you fall onto the ground, into the ocean, against a tree trunk, or into the mouth of a lion. Falling is bad so don't fall. :)
     

    Nataaaan

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Brazil
    Yes. We assume when a person falls that the fall is to the ground (or floor).
    Don't walk too fast. You might fall.
    It doesn't matter whether you fall onto the ground, into the ocean, against a tree trunk, or into the mouth of a lion. Falling is bad so don't fall. :)
    Thank you so much!!
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Another option for a human falling:
    ... you might fall down.
    I saw a man fall down in the street.

    Fall down
    implies "...to the ground". In an extreme case, you may fall flat on the ground, or fall face down on the ground.
     
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