"My translation" or "Loosely translated"?

Ellen89

Member
Sweden, swedish
Hello!
I am writing my thesis right now. I have translated some names of a couples of organizations and books/documents from Spanish to English.

I wonder what I should write in the footnote, “My translation” or “Loosely translated”. Which one sounds the most academic?

I haven’t found any official translations of any of these organizations.
 
  • The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    "My translation" would seem more likely in a footnote — but is it a translation or just an approximation?

    In running text you could say "xx, which loosely translates / can be loosely translated as yy..." "Roughly" is an another option.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    They don't mean the same thing to me.
    My translation - A translation I did which may be good or bad depending on my skill.
    Loose translation - A translation that could have been done by someone else that is not bad but not very good.
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    They don't mean the same thing to me.
    My translation - A translation I did which may be good or bad depending on my skill.
    Loose translation - A translation that could have been done by someone else that is not bad but not very good.
    :thumbsup:

    A loose translation is a bad translation.
    A literal translation is often a bad translation too.
    "My translation" is guaranteed 99.6% accurate (on a good day).:rolleyes:
     

    RedwoodGrove

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    :thumbsup:

    A loose translation is a bad translation.
    A literal translation is often a bad translation too.
    "My translation" is guaranteed 99.6% accurate (on a good day).:rolleyes:
    "Keith's translation" means the BEST translation. ;)

    "Loose" and "literal" translation are often counterpoints (opposites) to one another. So to Ellen89, your translation may be extremely accurate. The question seems to be how to say "my translation" in proper academic form. Many American universities use the Purdue OWL guides.

    The Purdue OWL: Academic Writing

    (And for some reason I can't get the link to work.) There must be a BrE equivalent.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I would think I would foot note it "translated from the original by Ellen 89".

    You could have an additional note specifying your qualifications for translating such as, "Ellen 89 has completed 2 years of college Spanish and lived for 3 years in Andalusia. Ellen 89 has a demonstrated competence in Spanish/English translations."
     

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    If you can't find any official translations of these organisations, I suggest that you retain the original Spanish and simply write your translation in brackets after this, if you think this is necessary.

    In other words, "my translation" or "loosely translated" makes me wonder why you want to add these words. :)
     

    Kirusha

    Senior Member
    If you can't find any official translations of these organisations, I suggest that you retain the original Spanish and simply write your translation in brackets after this, if you think this is necessary.

    In other words, "my translation" or "loosely translated" makes me wonder why you want to add these words. :)
    That's very good advice. I think it's pretty much standard practice when no official translation is available.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    According to the University of Illinois, the format is as follows:

    Non-English journal article:
    3. Kristien Nys and Anita Wouters, “De betekenis van empowerment voor het opvoedingsondersteunend werken met kansarme gezinnen” [The Relevance of Empowerment for Educational Support to Underprivileged Families], Pedagogisch Tijdschrift 26, no. 1 (2001): 19–43 (translation by author).


    Footnote Guidelines
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    In academic works, I have seen (my translation) or (author's translation) included at the end of the passage. These seem perfectly acceptable to me.
     
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