my vs that I have acquired

marcbatco

Senior Member
Italian-Italy
Hi, I would like to please ask you which of the expressions in bold is correct and if there is any difference in meaning in the following:
I can contribute to the success of the company by employing the skills that I have acquired in the areas of financial mathematics, and of the mathematical modelling of physical phenomena.
I can contribute to the success of the company by employing my skills in the areas of financial mathematics, and of the mathematical modelling of physical phenomena.
 
  • marcbatco

    Senior Member
    Italian-Italy
    Hi, marcbatco. I prefer the shorter "my skills" in that sentence. Brevity is often a beautiful thing.
    Hi owlman5, and thank you for your answer. What about this modification: I can contribute to the success of the company by employing my analytical skills and (the/my?) competencies in the areas of financial mathematics, and of the mathematical modelling of physical phenomena?
     
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    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    You're welcome, marc. I still prefer "my skills".

    I really don't think you need to modify "skills" with "analytical". Nor do I think you need to add the buzz word "competencies" to the mix. Whoever is reading this has probably already seen most of the clichés that people use in their resumés. Anything you can do to avoid clichés and wordiness will make your resumé seem more interesting.
     
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    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    I completely agree. Keep it simple. Going by the many questions you've asked here, this mammoth CV seems to be growing into the kind of mega-tome that no-one will want to read!

    Be honest. Nobody wants to "contribute to the success" of their employer. They just want a job, preferably an interesting one that they will enjoy doing.
     

    marcbatco

    Senior Member
    Italian-Italy
    You're welcome, marc. I still prefer "my skills".

    I really don't think you need to modify "skills" with "analytical". Nor do I think you need to add the buzz word "competencies" to the mix. Whoever is reading this has probably already seen most of the clichés that people use in their resumés. Anything you can do to avoid clichés and wordiness will make your resumé seem more interesting.
    I completely agree. Keep it simple. Going by the many questions you've asked here, this mammoth CV seems to be growing into the kind of mega-tome that no-one will want to read!

    Be honest. Nobody wants to "contribute to the success" of their employer. They just want a job, preferably an interesting one that they will enjoy doing.
    Thank you, owlman5 and Edinburgher. If you omit of physical phenomena, then is it correct to omit the article the before mathematical modelling, and just say: ... by employing my skills in the areas of financial mathematics, of mathematical modelling, and of data processing and statistical analysis.?
     
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