"My/Your" present?

AlbertoForin

Senior Member
Italian
When you have got a present from your friend, how do you say thanks to them?

Which is correct?
A. Thank you for your present.
B. Thank you for my present.

Which is correct? And any other expressions?

Thank you in advance.
 
  • bearded

    Senior Member
    Hello
    I would say ''for your present''. But an even more dubious situation - in my opinion - is when you give someone a present. Do you say ''here is my present'' or ''here is your present''? Let us see what native speakers have to say.
     

    cossack5

    Senior Member
    Russian
    AlbertoForin, It appears to me that a present "belongs" to a person who's presented it, i.e. 'if I give a present to my mother she will thank me for my present'.
    Nevertheless, I don't see anything bad about your present.
     

    JustKate

    Moderate Mod
    Of Alberto's two options, "Thank you for your present" is probably most common, though I've definitely heard "Thank you for my present" as well. But what I mostly say and hear is "Thank you for the present." That is by far the most common, I'm pretty sure, and as an additional benefit, it sidesteps the whole who-owns-it? dilemma entirely. :)
     

    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    The only time I would use either would be if I needed to make some distinction:

    "Well, you've eaten your cake, you've enjoyed your stripper, now it's time to give you your present."
    vs.
    "Everything everyone else gave you is junk. Now, here's MY present!"

    Otherwise, I'd almost certainly say "thank you for the present" (or, in reality, just "thank you," but that doesn't really answer the question).

    Edit: Crossposted and in agreement with JustKate.
     

    cossack5

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Of Alberto's two options, "Thank you for your present" is probably most common, though I've definitely heard "Thank you for my present" as well. But what I mostly say and hear is "Thank you for the present." That is by far the most common, I'm pretty sure, and as an additional benefit, it sidesteps the whole who-owns-it? dilemma entirely. :)
    Doesn't thank you for my present sound a bit discourteous / impolite? For example, in our parts - Russia - like phrases connote some kind of a desire/wish to possess the present as quickly as possible. T
     

    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    Doesn't thank you for my present sound a bit discourteous / impolite? For example, in our parts - Russia - like phrases connote some kind of a desire/wish to possess the present as quickly as possible. T
    It doesn't have that connotation for me. (Don't you say it after you have the present anyway?)
     

    cossack5

    Senior Member
    Russian
    (Don't you say it after you have the present anyway?)
    A good question :). I meant that when you have given someone a present they doesn't consider it their own yet, there must be a short wait before the present is "rightfully" theirs.:)
    As to before-after thing, generally, I've seen both variants.
     

    JustKate

    Moderate Mod
    I agree with POB. "Thank you for my present" to me just means "Thank you for the nice thing that you've given me." It means exactly the same thing as "Thank you for the present," but it's just a more unusual way of saying it.
     

    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    A good question :). I meant that when you have given someone a present they doesn't consider it their own yet, there must be a short wait before the present is "rightfully" theirs.:)
    Huh. If they grab it back fast enough, do I lose it? :D

    No, I get what you mean, but I guess that's a cultural difference.
     

    AlbertoForin

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Of Alberto's two options, "Thank you for your present" is probably most common, though I've definitely heard "Thank you for my present" as well. But what I mostly say and hear is "Thank you for the present." That is by far the most common, I'm pretty sure, and as an additional benefit, it sidesteps the whole who-owns-it? dilemma entirely. :)
    Thank you very much! As you said, I have heard native speakers say both... Could you explain more about "who owns it"? I said "please pick up your present at the office.", then she said "whose?" I'm confused...
     

    JustKate

    Moderate Mod
    I don't understand your question, Alberto. I don't see how anybody could find "Please pick up your present at the office" confusing, unless you and the other person had both left presents at the office.

    But this is rather an unusual situation because how often does it happen that somebody leaves a present for someone else "at the office"?

    It all comes down to context, as so many things do. If it's Alberto's birthday and Kate says, "I left your present in the car," "I left my present in the car" or "I left the present in the car," Alberto should assume that it's a present that will be given to him because it's his birthday. Even if it's Christmas, when the custom is that people exchange presents, if Kate says any of those three things, Alberto should assume it's a present to be given to him unless there's some way Kate might already have in her possession the present Alberto is giving to her.
     

    Sweetboat

    Senior Member
    Korean
    When I offer a gift to somebody, which is correct?

    When the giver speaks to the recipient,
    1) This is 'my' present. (Because I give you this)
    2) This is 'your' present. (Because you own this now)
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    I probably would just say “This is for you.” If I’m offering them a gift-wrapped object, it’s probably unnecessary to identify it as a present. If for some reason the item isn’t obviously a present, I’d probably say “This is a present for you” or “I got you a present.”

    “This is my present” would tend to sound as though the present had been given to the person speaking, and would need some context to make the opposite meaning clear.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top