nag vs moan

Tsz Long Ng

Member
Cantonese, Hong Kong
Do moan and nag have the same meaning? Do they both mean to complain in an annoying way?
1 My mum keep moaning at me about my poor exam result.
2 My mum keeps nagging me about my poorexam result.
 
  • Scrawny goat

    Senior Member
    English - Ireland
    In the example you gave, they do. But in general they do not.

    One may moan, vaguely or about something, with or without another person to moan to.

    One nags someone about something they do, or fail to do.
     

    Franco-filly

    Senior Member
    English - Southern England
    I would suggest "moaning" suites your context best.
    When nagging one tends to be constantly/repeatedly telling someone to do something. So, as a consequence of your poor results, she might keep nagging you to put more effort into doing your homework, to turn the telly off when you are studying, to pay attention in class, etc.
     

    Tsz Long Ng

    Member
    Cantonese, Hong Kong
    I would suggest "moaning" suites your context best.
    When nagging one tends to be constantly/repeatedly telling someone to do something. So, as a consequence of your poor results, she might keep nagging you to put more effort into doing your homework, to turn the telly off when you are studying, to pay attention in class, etc.
    Do you mean nagging may be positive, but moaning must be negative?
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Moan means to complain/grumble – usually in a fairly general way. (Oh, I’m so tired. My feet are killing me!)

    Nag means to persistently berate or badger someone else about something they’ve done, or should have done, or whatever. (Go and put the bins out. Now! I’ve asked you three times already!)
     

    Tsz Long Ng

    Member
    Cantonese, Hong Kong
    How about the verb hassle?
    Eg: My mum keeps hasslng me about my poor exam result. Does this have a different meaning as the above 2 examples?
     
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