Native Preference for R?

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BasedowLives

Senior Member
uSa
Hello

This question comes from the fact that sometimes I'm proud of myself for sounding decent and some days I'm absolutely terrible at pronouncing R's in spanish, and it ends up sounding like a D or a weird T sound or some horrible combination of both.

In situations like this, would it be easier for you to understand the word if one were to just anglo-cize the R and say it with no trill at all or to attempt anyway?

I will obviously keep working with proper pronounciation regardless, but in situations where I need to convey my point quickly, a basic understanding is all I'm looking for.

ps
aldrededor <--my least favorite word to say ever:eek:
 
  • mhp

    Senior Member
    American English
    BasedowLives said:
    Hello
    ps
    aldrededor <--my least favorite word to say ever:eek:
    If you say alrededor it would be easier.

    BTW, my least favorite word is otorrinolaringólogo. Here is something to practice saying to improve your R pronunciation: Un burro comía berros y el perro se los robó, el burro lanzó un rebuzno, y el perro al barro cayó.
     

    fenixpollo

    moderator
    American English
    No matter how you say the "r", as long as it isn't mistaken for another letter, I think it's fine. For example, if you want to say that something was regenerated but the first "r" comes out as a "d" and you say it was degenerado, then it creates a problem. ;)

    Most native speakers I have met say that they enjoy hearing me make an effort to pronounce things as they do, whether or not I actually do pronounce things with their accent.

    As far as I'm concerned, no matter what language you speak, any accent is acceptable as long as communication happens.

    I know that you have seen the thread on "that one word" (link), which for me is either refrigerador or catedral, but others might enjoy it.

    Saludos.
     

    Phryne

    Senior Member
    Argieland--Esp/Eng
    fenixpollo said:
    No matter how you say the "r", as long as it isn't mistaken for another letter, I think it's fine. For example, if you want to say that something was regenerated but the first "r" comes out as a "d" and you say it was degenerado, then it creates a problem. ;)

    Most native speakers I have met say that they enjoy hearing me make an effort to pronounce things as they do, whether or not I actually do pronounce things with their accent.

    As far as I'm concerned, no matter what language you speak, any accent is acceptable as long as communication happens.

    I know that you have seen the thread on "that one word" (link), which for me is either refrigerador or catedral, but others might enjoy it.

    Saludos.
    As a native speaker I second PhoenixPollo (hi Pollito!). I have no problem with a funny aldredor although you may want to practice a bit more for I know it is perfectly possible to pronounce (my SO keeps getting better and better at this, in his opinion, horrendous word). As I said, in the meantime pronounce the best you can like aldrededor or make a pause as SO used to do al---rededor. :cool:

    Further to Pollito's message about confusing natives, be careful with raro. For some reason I can't understand any of you Americans when you try to say this specific word. :rolleyes:

    Saludos
     

    BasedowLives

    Senior Member
    uSa
    pingüinodundo said:
    aldrededor:cross:
    alrededor:tick:

    I think it was maybe a typo, but maybe that might help?
    yeah it was a typo, but that wasn't really what i was getting at with my post.

    the point was that some days i have a terrible time pronouncing R's. And i was wondering if it'd be easier for spanish speakers to understand me if i just gave up attempting to get the R and say it like an extreme gringo for that moment so they know that what i'm saying is an R and not some "th" or "dz" sound.
     

    Chaska Ñawi

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    I learned my Spanish in Bolivia, where the primary r or double r is pronounced zzzz or zzh. Eventually I learned to roll my r's, but when I'm speaking with Bolivians (and sometimes when I'm not) I still revert back to the way I first learned it.

    Speaking with Ecuadoreans for the first time was a shock, because they use a similar sound ... but for ll.
     
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