Nature of God's tribulations?

Discussion in 'English Only' started by Waji, Apr 21, 2017.

  1. Waji

    Waji Member

    Urdu
    Hi! everyone.
    Could you tell me whether the question "what is the nature of God's tribulations?" includes the idea that why does god visits tribulations upon men?(should I use question mark here or not?) Whether to put to test their faith or for their sins.
    Is the italicized idea embedded in the question in bold?
     
  2. se16teddy

    se16teddy Senior Member

    London but from Yorkshire
    English - England
    Without context I read it to mean in what ways does God suffer? but I suppose it might in some contexts mean in what ways does God make people suffer?
     
  3. truffe2miel

    truffe2miel Senior Member

    91
    French (France)
    Reading only this sentence with no further explanation, I don't see any clue as to whom this tribulations are dealt to. Men or God himself might suffer, out of any number of reasons unsaid and impossible to deduce.

    Would you tell us more about the context/paragraph you read it in?
     
  4. PaulQ

    PaulQ Senior Member

    UK
    English - England
    In evangelistic theology, God's tribulations - usually God's trials and tribulations - refer to the belief that God sends [trials and] tribulations to His Children - He maims, blinds, cripples kills, starves, causes grief and suffering to, infects, etc., endless numbers of people "in order to test them and strengthen their faith and to make them better people."

    The usual context is embodied in the question "Why does God let bad things happen to good people." A question for which the Bible has several, not altogether convincing/reassuring, answers.
     
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2017
  5. Waji

    Waji Member

    Urdu
    Thanks for your helpful replies.
    So, do you mean the question "what is the nature of God's trials and tribulations?" does not embody the idea that why does God let bad things happen to good people?
     
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2017
  6. dojibear Senior Member

    Fresno CA
    English - America
    No it doesn't, because the possessive "God's" means "of God" but that can have more than one meaning. There are probably more than just these few:

    the trials of God = the trials God endures
    the trials of God = the trials God forces someone else to endure
    the trials of God = tasks which God proposes: anyone who willingly does them and succeeds will be rewarded
    the trials of God = trials which are often associated with God
     
  7. PaulQ

    PaulQ Senior Member

    UK
    English - England
    Hmmm. I believe that the sentence does address the question "Why does God let bad things happen to good people?"

    However, "What is the nature of God's trials and tribulations?" means "How can we explain/understand the nature of the things that are (i) perceived by mankind as being painful, worrying, troublesome, disastrous, etc., and (ii) caused by God, who allegedly loves us."

    If you accept the idea of a supreme deity, it is not possible that the deity has His own "trials and tribulations"

    1. Imagine that it is your birthday. Your sister asks you:

    Sister: "I saw John yesterday, he told me that he had sent you a present. Have you received John's present yet?"
    Waji: "Yes, I have got John's present." -> I have received the present that John sent to me

    2. Imagine that it is John's birthday tomorrow. Your sister asks you.

    Sister: "It is John's birthday tomorrow. Have you bought John's present yet?"
    Waji: "Yes, I have got John's present." -> I have bought the present that I will give to John.



    Edited 20:25 to remove repeated word.
     
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2017
  8. Waji

    Waji Member

    Urdu
    I am much obliged to you for your detailed answer Paul.
     
  9. truffe2miel

    truffe2miel Senior Member

    91
    French (France)
    I think that the actual meaning of the sentence can only be really understood within its context. Alone, it only means some kind of religious trial, directly linked to God.
     

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