Neapolitan: N'è lu vero nio tè

  • Nino83

    Senior Member
    Italian
    (But the translation of this line is strange!)
    Yes, because the translation refers to the version of the Neapolitan singer Roberto Murolo (search it on youtube) where he sings:
    Tiritomba, tiritomba,
    Tiritomba a ll'aria va
    Tiritomba, tiritomba,
    Tiritomba a ll'aria va.

    Also the version sung by Nicolai Gedda has the same text.

    I found that the words "N'è lu vero nio tè" are present only in those versions sung by foreign singers.
    It doesn't make any sense to me, but I'm Sicilian.
    Wait for a Neapolitan native speaker to answer.
     

    Pugnator

    Senior Member
    Neapoilitan (Naples) / Italian (Italy)
    I'm Neapolitan and I think that"N'è lu vero nio tè" make no sense. Also the song is sang principal by German and Russian singer, the only Neapolitan singer thatI found was Murolo (and on Murolo's version there aren't this words) so I think that this is a song created by emigrant, and during his diffusion those words got corrupted. Sorry for my bad English.
     

    Pugnator

    Senior Member
    Neapoilitan (Naples) / Italian (Italy)
    Well, it's hard. The first part "N'è lu vero" can be interpreted as "isn't the truth" (or even as "isn't the true [one]). because " N' " could be a shortened version of "not" . Regarding the second part (nio tè) I've no idea, maybe tè is an onomatopoeic sound like "Thè" with no particular meaning used for rhythmic reason and to reinforce the sentence. Regarding "Nio" I've no idea, it could be a corruption of "mio" that mean my,mine but would make no sense, maybe it is a corruption of "ninno" (it could mean Kid,child,boy,guy (It could have also an affective "tone") ). That's are only my thought, but I don't think to have guessed the original meaning.
     

    Pugnator

    Senior Member
    Neapoilitan (Naples) / Italian (Italy)
    An example of "Thè" is found on this macchietta that got her lyrics translated into english. The creator of the translation translated it with "Well," Neapolitan Songs - Texts - La cammesella .

    [unauthorised video removed by moderator as per Forum Rules#4]
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    bobh

    New Member
    English - Australia
    An example of "Thè" is found on this macchietta that got her lyrics translated into english. The creator of the translation translated it with "Well," Neapolitan Songs - Texts - La cammesella .

    [unauthorised video removed by moderator as per Forum Rules#4]
    I'm Neapolitan and I think that"N'è lu vero nio tè" make no sense. Also the song is sang principal by German and Russian singer, the only Neapolitan singer thatI found was Murolo (and on Murolo's version there aren't this words) so I think that this is a song created by emigrant, and during his diffusion those words got corrupted. Sorry for my bad English.
    Dear Pugnator,
    You can see sheet music under the name Guglielmo Cottrau at https://app.box.com/s/00utw9ai8k83lt9g1zoh.
    It looks to me like the line is "Tiritomba n'è lu veconio tè". Does that make sense to a Neapolitan?
     
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