Need a synonym for 'dessert'

toniga

Senior Member
Mexico, Spanish
Please could anybody help me? I need a synonym for the word 'dessert' which I cannot find. I am told there is at least one used by the British. I have no context except the description I found in the dictionary :"Something sweet that is eaten after the main part of a meal", hosever I found no synonym.

Thank you all in advance.

Toniga
 
  • Alpha0ne

    Senior Member
    England English/Spanish
    Hi Toniga,
    The words that come to mind are: "Sweet" or "afters". I will let you know if I get any more sweet thoughts...
    Hope I could help.
    Cheers!
     

    tim

    Member
    Australia, English
    "Sweet" would be most appropriate.

    I work in a restaurant and alternate between offering people the "dessert menu" and the "sweets menu", depending on which phrase I feel like using...
     

    Mr X

    Member
    Australia, English
    What about 'pudding?'

    It's not very sophisticated, but you might hear a kid ask after dinner, "What's for pudding?"

    Again, it depends on how you want to use it, but it's an option.
    Mr X.
     

    dave

    Senior Member
    UK - English
    Yes, pudding is the most common in BrE, and is used generically (i.e. not just for 'puddings', if that makes sense). Afters is also very common.

    Dessert and sweet are both fairly formal and high register, and would not normally be used outside a restaurant context, or very posh dinner party (or am I just betraying my Northern origins?!).

    Child: What's for pudding mum?
    Mum: Ice cream or trifle. But you're not getting any pudding until you've eaten your sprouts.
     

    Tormenta

    Senior Member
    Argentina-Español
    dave said:
    Yes, pudding is the most common in BrE, and is used generically (i.e. not just for 'puddings', if that makes sense). Afters is also very common.

    Dessert and sweet are both fairly formal and high register, and would not normally be used outside a restaurant context, or very posh dinner party (or am I just betraying my Northern origins?!).

    Child: What's for pudding mum?
    Mum: Ice cream or trifle. But you're not getting any pudding until you've eaten your sprouts.

    Many people say "sweet" in the North West, well , at least in Lancashire. And I would not call them posh. :cool:

    Actually, I heard it yesterday when somebody said to me: "Can I offer you some Sweet, 'luv'? There is trifle, apple pie, chocolate cake, ice cream, etc..
    But again, this might be a Lancashire thing.

    Also, I find the "puddings" very confusing. I ordered a "Yorkshire Pudding" for dessert. It was my fault; I have heard so much about it, so I ordered one without kowing what it was :eek: And , of course, my so called friends did not warn me.

    Tormenta:)
     

    Silvia

    Senior Member
    Italian
    I guess the most appropriate synonym should be afters, if we think of what dessert means.

    Dessert defines the last course of a meal, which can be either cheese, or fruit or a sweet.

    Dessert should only be followed by a drink (coffee, lace, liquour).
     

    Tormenta

    Senior Member
    Argentina-Español
    silviap said:
    I guess the most appropriate synonym should be afters, if we think of what dessert means.

    Dessert defines the last course of a meal, which can be either cheese, or fruit or a sweet.

    Dessert should only be followed by a drink (coffee, lace, liquour).

    In my opinion, a good dessert can be followed by "something else" , not just drinks. ;)
    But that's another topic and might not be appropriate for a modest forum such as this one; therefore, I shall refrain from talking about it. :p

    Tormenta:)
     

    Focalist

    Senior Member
    European Union, English
    I do remember seeing an episode of "Dallas" on Spanish TV. The original title of the episode was "Just Desserts". Up on the screen came... "Sólo Postres".

    F
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Focalist said:
    I do remember seeing an episode of "Dallas" on Spanish TV. The original title of the episode was "Just Desserts". Up on the screen came... "Sólo Postres".

    F
    Thus, "What do you get when you cross an English speaking European with a Spanish television station and a brain-dead translator?

    Why, your just desserts, of course.


    AE is very weak language in the dessert category. We don't use 'sweets' or 'pudding', and I know of no other alternatives to dessert, but to skip it and proceed merrily to the later course Tormenta has suggested as a possibility.

    un saludo,
    Cuchu
     

    Focalist

    Senior Member
    European Union, English
    cuchufléte said:
    Thus, "What do you get when you cross an English speaking European with a Spanish television station and a brain-dead translator?
    I should say that this English-speaking European (Focalist) can't spell, either :eek:.
    The original title of the episode, as first broadcast in the United States on 14 March 1986, was correctly spelt as Just Deserts.
    In any case, Sólo postres was a much better title than Desiertos, nada más!

    F
     

    Becky85

    Senior Member
    England, English
    I'm a Lancashire girl and me and all my family have always called it 'afters'.

    However many of my friends in Lancashire call it 'pudding'.

    Either are equally appropriate, although I would say that 'afters' was more colloquial than 'pudding' - I think 'pudding' is probably more common.
     

    Tormenta

    Senior Member
    Argentina-Español
    Focalist said:
    I should say that this English-speaking European (Focalist) can't spell, either
    The original title of the episode, as first broadcast in the United States on 14 March 1986, was correctly spelt as Just Deserts.
    In any case, Sólo postres was a much better title than Desiertos, nada más!

    F

    :D :D and I spent the whole afternoon trying to understand what was wrong with translating " Just Desserts" as " solo postres" :eek:

    Tormenta:)
     
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