Nestled/Nestling at the foot of the Pyrenees ...

Wookie

Senior Member
Korea, Korean
Nestled at the foot of the Pyrenees near the Basque country in southwestern France, the town of Pau is home to Total’s global research center and a communication hub linking its global operations.

This is from an article in TIME about a French oil company, Total.

I'd like to know if these two usages are both correct.
If so, which one is more widely used?
"The town nestles at the foot of the Pyrenees."
"The town is nesteld at the foot of the Pyrenees."
 
  • Wookie

    Senior Member
    Korea, Korean
    I believe that "is nestled" is more idiomatic.
    Is that true that "is nestled" is more idiomatic?
    These are examples from dictionaries. I haven't found any example using "be nestled".

    The little town nestles snugly at the foot of the hill. (Oxford Dictionary)

    Bregenz is a pretty Austrian town that nestles between the Alps and Lake Constance. (Cambridge Dictionary)

    a cottage nestling in a pine grove. (Dictionary.com)
     

    Wookie

    Senior Member
    Korea, Korean
    Google searches told me that "nestled at" is more widely used than "nestling at".
    I think the sentences in the dictionaries are a little bit old-fashioned. What do you think?
     

    George French

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    Nesteld and nestling are both used. You can see in wookie's 2nd post the following "Bregenz is a pretty Austrian town that nestles between the Alps and Lake Constance".

    A minor change produces "Bregenz is a pretty Austrian town that nestles nestling between the Alps and Lake Constance".

    They both mean the same: different grammer.

    GF..

    To answer wookie; they are old fashioned, maybe; so what?
     
    Last edited:

    Wookie

    Senior Member
    Korea, Korean
    Nesteld and nestling are both used. You can see in wookie's 2nd post the following "Bregenz is a pretty Austrian town that nestles between the Alps and Lake Constance".

    A minor change produces "Bregenz is a pretty Austrian town that nestles nestling between the Alps and Lake Constance".

    They both mean the same: different grammer.

    GF..
    Is the passive form "be nestled at" more widely used than "to nestle at"?
     
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