'Nevertheless' the first group of users [=Consequently?]

ENGLISHIAN

Member
Korean
Hi!

The concept of execution environment is an essential part of the definition of software reliability. Consider that a software system supports 10 different functions f 1, …, f 10, and there are two groups of users. One group of users use only functions f 1, …, f 7, and the second group uses all the functions. Let functions f 1, …, f 7 be fault free, but there are faults in functions f 8, f 9, and f 10. (Consequently, Nevertheless) the first group of users will never observe any failure simply because their operations of the software system do not involve the faulty components of the software. From the viewpoint of the first group of users, the probability of failure-free operation of the software is 1.0. On the other hand, the second group of users will observe failure from time to time, depending upon how frequently they use functions f 8, f 9, and f 10. In consequence, the level of reliability perceived by the second group of users is lower than that perceived by the first group of users.
(from 2013 Sunungtukgang p.69 : EBS)

I know Consequently is right because the following can be the result of 'Let functions f 1, …, f 7 be fault free, but there are faults in functions f 8, f 9, and f 10'. However, is Nevertheless also possible if it is viewed as 'Though there are faults in functions f 8, f 9, and f 10.'? Are there some rules you know about this choice?
Please, I need your help.
 
  • djmc

    Senior Member
    English - United Kingdom
    I am not sure that I would use either. I think I would write

    If a system supports multiple functions, users will only discover that a function is deficient or faulty if they actually use a particular function and it fails for them, they will remain unaffected by features that they do not use and will not be aware of them.

    This is a lot simpler but I don't think the first example says any more. I think there is a tendency in software circles to try to make thinjs sound more complicated then they are, and I think this is one of them.
     

    lucas-sp

    Senior Member
    English - Californian
    Once you specify that there aren't faults in f1-7, then you can only use "consequently." I suppose "nevertheless" would be possible if we didn't spell out the fact that f1-7 were fault-free:
    One group of users use only functions f 1, …, f 7, and the second group uses all the functions. There are faults in functions f 8, f 9, and f 10. Nevertheless, the first group of users will never observe any failure simply because their operations of the software system do not involve the faulty components of the software.
     

    ENGLISHIAN

    Member
    Korean
    Thank you for your help, djmc. I also appreciate your help, lucas-sp!
    I have one question for lucas-sp. I know nevertheless means 'despite what has been said'. I have understood your comment like this: in ‘despite what has been said’, what has been said should be the previous full sentence, not part of it. right?
    "Despite letting functions f 1, …, f 7 be fault free, but there being faults in functions f 8, f 9, and f 10, the first group of users will never observe any failure simply because their operations of the software system do not involve the faulty components of the software." is not correct. Hmmm.....
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    (Consequently, Nevertheless) the first group of users will never observe any failure simply because their operations of the software system do not involve the faulty components of the software.
    Simply put, neither word is required. The only adverb that fits is Obviously. If people are using fault-free functions, they will not find faults.
     
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