nevica e fiocca

Sybil

Senior Member
US
Poland/Polish
Hi, all!

I stumbled upon the word "fiocca" today ("fiocca" translated not as "snowflake" but as "it's snowing").
My question is, "nevica" is still a more common expression for "it's snowing" than "fiocca" is, is that right? I'm just guessing here...
 
  • Alfry

    Senior Member
    Italian
    really very interesting question

    I'll try to do my best.

    fiocca from the verb fioccare = to fall in flakes; to snow

    examples are: fiocca? = is it snowing?
    lenta la neve fiocca = the snow is falling slowly in large flakes

    it's also used in a general way
    for examples when you use 'to shower'
    "fioccarono gli applausi" = there was a shower of applause
    "fioccano i complimenti su Sybil" = "compliments are showered on Sybil"
     

    leenico

    Senior Member
    U.S.A. english
    I stumbled upon the word "fiocca" today ("fiocca" translated not as "snowflake" but as "it's snowing").
    My question is, "nevica" is still a more common expression for "it's snowing" than "fiocca" is, is that right? I'm just guessing here...
    Sybil, fiocca comes from the infinitive form of the verb fiocarre. This comes from my new English, Italian dictionary. It means (neve) to fall. To come thick & fast. :D
     

    Sybil

    Senior Member
    US
    Poland/Polish
    Alfry, great examples... (especially the last one, e-hem lol) grazie!

    Silvia... :))) hm....yes... rain falls... but when it comes down really hard, you can say it pours. Is that how I am to interpret nevica=falls and fiocca=coming down fast and thick?
    Great comparison :) Works for me! Thanks a bunch!

    Leenico, thanks for the dictionary definition. :))

    Thank you all! Now I see the difference between the two...
     
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