new <if battered> face

  • exgerman

    Senior Member
    NYC
    English but my first language was German
    First, punctuate correctly:

    While Mr. Clinton was a relatively new, if battered, face, ready for his reintroduction in 1992, Mrs. Clinton is a political institution.

    In 1992, Mr. Clinton was a relatively new face, although even then he was battered by political vendettas.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Hello, members!

    While Mr. Clinton was a relatively new if battered face, ready for his reintroduction in 1992, Mrs. Clinton is a political institution.
    (http://www.nytimes.com/2016/07/25/us/politics/hillary-clinton-voters.html?_r=0)

    Can anyone please explain what does "if battered face" mean here? Thank you in advance!=)
    You should read it as:
    While Mr. Clinton was a relatively new, if battered, face ready for his reintroduction in 1992, Mrs. Clinton is a political institution.
    There is a comma missing.

    It's a new face, even if it has been battered.
     

    grimbergen

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Thank you so much, exgerman and JulianStuart! So there was a comma missing!
    I just wonder that does "batter" mean "damage" here?: "While Mr. Clinton was a relatively new, if he were damaged(?), face..." This is a bit difficult for me to understand what does "if battered" mean exactly.
     
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