New version of <like flint and steel>?

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High on grammar

Senior Member
Farsi
Hello everyone:

I understand that <like flint and steel> is an outdated expression and would like to know the new version it.

Here’s the situation I have in mind:

Two people who are always arguing with each other and getting into fights.

[they can’t be left alone together for a minute; they are like flint and steel].

What else can I say in place of like flint and steel here?

In Farsi, we say they are like cats and dogs, which is something I could use in English.

Thanks
 
  • sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Although I'm familiar with flint and steel as archaic fire starters, I don't count it as current AE, except, perhaps, in some computer games or speaking of flintlock firearms.
    "Cats and dogs" works fine, in my opinion.
     

    Ponyprof

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    I feel like I've heard ,"fighting like cats and dogs" as an English idiom.

    I've certainly heard "raining cats and dogs" for heavy rain but I have no idea where that idiom originates!
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Things that don't mix are like oil and water.

    If they go beyond dislike to physical confrontation they are fighting like cats and dogs.

    But that is sometimes said of family members, too - husbands and wives, brothers and sisters, brothers and brothers, sisters and sisters.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Here’s the situation I have in mind:

    Two people who are always arguing with each other and getting into fights.
    If you mean actual fights (physical attacks on each other) I don't know any English expression for that.

    Ongoing milder action (arguing) is called "bickering". His wife and he contantly bicker with each other. It often goes with "constant":
    You two stop your constant bickering.

    I've heard BE speakers talk about two very different things (or two people that always disagree) as being as different as "chalk and cheese". I haven't heard this in AE.
     
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