Newbie

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  • Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    Antonio said:
    Hi Group,

    What does it mean "Newbie" and is the same thing as "Newcomer"?

    newbie INFORMAL
    a person who has recently started to use a computer or the Internet and does not know how to use it properly

    newcomer someone who has recently arrived in a place or recently become involved in an activity:
    We've lived here for 15 years, but we're relative newcomers to the village.
    The newcomer on the radio scene is a commercial station devoted to classical music.


    It seems that "newbie" is exclusively used to refer to computers and "newcomer" has a more general meaning.

    Bye, Art :) :p ;)
     

    jacinta

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Antonio- There is a TV show called "Scrubs" which is about interns at a hospital. The chief resident (head Dr. who oversees the interns) calls one of the new Dr.s "newbie" all the time.
    Although newbie may have gained fame through computer talk, the term is now slang used to describe anyone new to anything; a profession, a school, or even newborns!!! It is a very informal term, though.
     

    Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    Antonio said:
    "Newborns" is the long form and the short form is "Newbie"? am I right or not?


    newbie newbies
    A newbie is someone who is new to an activity, especially in computing or on the Internet.
    All newbies are offered an individually tailored training and development programme.

    (c) HarperCollins Publishers.



    newborn newborns also new-born, new born
    A newborn baby or animal is one that has just been born.
    This equipment has saved the lives of a number of new born children.
    ...new born lambs.

    The newborn are babies or animals who are newborn.
    Mild jaundice in the newborn is common and often clears without treatment.

    (c) HarperCollins Publishers.


    Antonio, "newbie" is not the short form for "newborn" as far as I know

    Art :) ;) :p
     

    Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    Antonio said:
    Hi Art, In what dictionary you usually look up these words? This dictionary have good definitions I can tell.


    Antonio, in what DICTIONARIESSSSSSSSS do I look up words? UHHH!!
    Cambridge, Oxford, Collins Cobuild, Merriam& Webster's, Longman. These are the dictionaries I have installed in my PC. Then I do some google, sometimes...


    Bye, Art :) ;) :p
     

    jacinta

    Senior Member
    USA English
    I will have to say that language is very flexible and people tend to twist and turn words to their choosing. Here in California especially, we like to shorten everything! You will not find this term in the dictionary defined as I have described, I'm only saying that I have heard it used this way. Please don't take my suggestions as any authority! In other words, take it with a grain of salt.
     

    Antonio

    Senior Member
    Mexico/Spanish
    Originally Posted by Artrella
    Antonio, in what DICTIONARIESSSSSSSSS do I look up words? UHHH!!
    Cambridge, Oxford, Collins Cobuild, Merriam& Webster's, Longman. These are the dictionaries I have installed in my PC. Then I do some google, sometimes...

    Let's see Cambridge has a website that is highly recommend for people that wanna learn slangs and idioms. Merriam & Webster is a good one for electronic dictionaries. The other ones that you mentioned, I can't find it on the Internet, what's the web address for Longman, Oxford, Collins and so on to look up these words in the dictionary?
     

    Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    Antonio said:
    Originally Posted by Artrella
    Antonio, in what DICTIONARIESSSSSSSSS do I look up words? UHHH!!
    Cambridge, Oxford, Collins Cobuild, Merriam& Webster's, Longman. These are the dictionaries I have installed in my PC. Then I do some google, sometimes...

    Let's see Cambridge has a website that is highly recommend for people that wanna learn slangs and idioms. Merriam & Webster is a good one for electronic dictionaries. The other ones that you mentioned, I can't find it on the Internet, what's the web address for Longman, Oxford, Collins and so on to look up these words in the dictionary?

    Longman, Oxfor and Collins Cobuild are CDs that I have installed in my PC. I think they are not on the Internet.

    Sorry Antonio, :(

    Art :) :p ;)
     

    Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    Antonio said:
    I found the websites for all the dictionaries except Collins. Here are the links:

    www.askoxford.com (British English)
    www.ldoceonline.com (Longman)
    dictionary.cambridge.org (Cambridge)
    www.m-w.com (Merriam-Webster)

    Thanks Art :thumbsup:

    P.S. If everyone knows the link to log on to Collins Dictionary Online, please let me know.

    Antonio, the Ask Oxford is not the one I have. But all the same, it's very good!!!

    I'll try to find Collins for you..

    :) ;) :p
     

    lsp

    Senior Member
    NY
    US, English
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:

    The informal term newbie ... means a newcomer to a particular corner of cyberspace, such as a game, newsgroup, or the World Wide Web itself or to an operating system. It can be both a disparaging and friendly term, always referring to a neophyte. The word itself is likely a corruption of new boy, the equivalent figure in real life—usually observed as a new arrival in a school and who is, therefore, vulnerable to bullying of various kinds. On Google's Usenet archive, the word first appears in 1988.
     

    matt 204

    New Member
    UK English
    Paolorausch - Noob and NEWBIE is not the same. ....... Noob arrives from the word nob (slang penis) noob is an extended version of nob hence big penis. Its designed as a mild insult to the recipient. At least that's the way I was led to believe it.

    I expect I was suppose to insert some of the icons that denote the approach of sensitive words somewhere amidst this post.
     

    wanabee

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Hi Group,

    What does it mean "Newbie" and is the same thing as "Newcomer"?
    Dear all,

    If a person, who's long been employed in a company, has just been transferred to a new section in the same company, the task of which has nothing in common with the job he's done before, could you call him or her a newbie in the new section? (Like their colleague might say, whether jokingly or not, "why don't we throw a welcome party for the newbie?")
     
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