newly coined / newly-coined term.

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vayatalaya

Senior Member
Spanish (Spain).
< Topic: "newly coined" or "newly-coined" term. >

Hello, everybody!

I'm here today with just a little doubt:

-Which one of the title is better, which one works better on you?
-What are the rules on this one?
-Is there another alternative to say the same but briefly?

Any suggestions will be appreciated, thanks in advance! :thumbsup:
 
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  • Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    Please give us the complete sentence in which you plan to use the phrase, as well as some context, so we can help you better.
     

    vayatalaya

    Senior Member
    Spanish (Spain).
    Hello, no problem, the context is when we are speaking of new words just invented, "neologisms" and the like, it is a open question speaking of new words invented as for example in science, what happened with the word quantum!

    The newly coined term quantum is now the fashion!
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    If it's "newly-coined" it can't be the fashion. It can't become the fashion until people have seen it and heard it, and then started using it. By then it's no longer newly-coined.

    However. You can say - the newly-coined "quantum" is a word that is becoming popular - or - the newly-coined word "quantum" is becoming popular - or - the newly-coined term "quantum physics" is becoming popular - or - the newly-coined "quantum physics" is becoming a popular term. You can, no doubt, see other variations on this theme. It's just a matter of choice and personal taste.
     

    vayatalaya

    Senior Member
    Spanish (Spain).
    If it's "newly-coined" it can't be the fashion. It can't become the fashion until people have seen it and heard it, and then started using it. By then it's no longer newly-coined. :thumbsup:

    However. You can say - the newly-coined "quantum" is a word that is becoming popular - or - the newly-coined word "quantum" is becoming popular - or - the newly-coined term "quantum physics" is becoming popular - or - the newly-coined "quantum physics" is becoming a popular term. You can, no doubt, see other variations on this theme. It's just a matter of choice and personal taste.
    I want to thank you for your recently-spent dedication and time. Thanks a lot!
     
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    Wordsmyth

    Senior Member
    Native language: English (BrE)
    I wouldn't say "newly-coined" is an appropriate description of the word "quantum", at least not if you're speaking in the present day. Granted, vayatalaya, that you said "what happened with the word quantum"; but even so, the word "quantum" has been around in English, with the sense of a discrete amount or portion, since the 16th century. Its use in the domain of physics (for a discrete quantity of energy) dates from the early 20th century, but the word wasn't coined (invented) then; it was just used.

    You could say that the phrases "quantum theory", "quantum mechanics", etc were coined then; but it wasn't those phrases that became 'fashionable'.

    Ws:)
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    I wouldn't say "newly-coined" is an appropriate description of the word "quantum",
    Neither would I, and nobody suggested it was newly coined. It was an example of how to write the various options using the word that vayatalaya had picked. I could equally well have used "phlogiston", but that's even less newly coined.
     

    Wordsmyth

    Senior Member
    Native language: English (BrE)
    Neither would I, and nobody suggested it was newly coined. [...]
    It seems to me vayatalaya did:
    speaking of new words invented as for example in science, what happened with the word quantum!

    The newly coined term quantum is now the fashion!
    That's what my comments were addressing, just to be sure that vayatalaya correctly understood the word "coined".

    No connection with (nor reflection on) your examples of sentence construction, Andy.:)

    Ws:)
     

    vayatalaya

    Senior Member
    Spanish (Spain).
    It seems to me vayatalaya did:
    That's what my comments were addressing, just to be sure that vayatalaya correctly understood the word "coined".

    No connection with (nor reflection on) your examples of sentence construction, Andy.:)

    Ws:)
    Yeah, I did, jajajaja, but... only because I went quick to offer some context to the question, and the first thing that came to my mind was that word, I supposed that the word wasn't invented, that it just become more fashionable, but I supposed, even with more security about, that, in "somehow", it had to be transformed, jajajajaja, so... in somewhat, both of you are correct! Sorry about that! I wasn't clear this time, let's see how clear I will be the next one, thanks for your help! :thumbsup: :)
     

    Wordsmyth

    Senior Member
    Native language: English (BrE)
    That's a great link for people who like rules, sdg.;)

    For me, the most important use of hyphens (which doesn't appear in that SJSU list) is to avoid ambiguity: "man-eating shark" vs "man eating shark"; three-year-old children" vs "three year-old children", and so on. I can't get excited about the difference between "newly coined" and "newly-coined".

    Ws:)
     
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