"newly coined" or "newly-coined"? - precariat

< Previous | Next >

8769

Senior Member
Japanese and Japan
The passage below is part of what I transcribed, listening to a radio program. The blank below is where I got stuck. The commentator is talking about the word"pricariat."

Which, #1 or #2 below, do you think I should write for the blank below?

1. newly coine.

2. newly-coined
A: What do you think about this ( ) term?

B: I think it's a great word, this "precariat."
I chose #2 first, but dictionaries at hand show #1. Do I understand only #1 is correct?
 
  • Joelline

    Senior Member
    American English
    There is a rule about not using a hyphen after adverbs ending in -ly. I don't know how closely it is followed, however. When I think of terms like "closely guarded secret" or highly recommended book," I know that I would not use a hyphen in either case.

    See HERE for more information about using hyphens in compounds.
     

    8769

    Senior Member
    Japanese and Japan
    I’m sorry I made some errors in my posting #1. The following is the corrected version of #1.

    The passage below is part of what I transcribed, listening to a radio program. The blank below is where I got stuck. The commentator is talking about the word "pricariat."

    Which, #1 or #2 below, do you think I should write for the blank below?

    1. newly coined
    2. newly-coined
    A: What do you think about this ( ) term?
    B: I think it's a great word, this "precariat."
    I chose #2 first, but dictionaries at hand show some phrases like #1, ie. “a newly married couple” from “Merriam Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary”(10th ed.). Do I understand only #1 is correct?
     

    Harry Batt

    Senior Member
    USA English
    8769 Could you tell us where you picked up "precariat?" I have not been able to find it in my collection of dictionaries or with M-W. What was the source where you found it? That is, you heard it on the radio. Did you consult a dictionary to confirm its spelling? What definition did the speaker give?
     

    Trisia

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    @ Harry Batt - Well, it is supposed to be newly coined :D
    I'm not even sure if it's precariat or pricariat (8769 used both forms twice)
     

    Harry Batt

    Senior Member
    USA English
    8769 you have introduced us to the birth of a new English word. << Precariat" is a new Japanese word combining the English words "precarious," referring to the insecurity of part-time and contract work, and "proletariat.">> From what I have
    read, contract work has been a vicious employment dodge or substitute out scheme. Thank you for the news article 8769.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    6.20. Do not use a hyphen in a two-word unit modifier the first
    element of which is an adverb ending in ly, ...

    Taken from Chapter 6 of the US Government Printing Office Style Manual
     

    Elwintee

    Senior Member
    England English
    I’m sorry I made some errors in my posting #1. The following is the corrected version of #1.

    The passage below is part of what I transcribed, listening to a radio program. The blank below is where I got stuck. The commentator is talking about the word "pricariat."

    Which, #1 or #2 below, do you think I should write for the blank below?

    1. newly coined
    2. newly-coined
    A: What do you think about this ( ) term?
    B: I think it's a great word, this "precariat."
    I chose #2 first, but dictionaries at hand show some phrases like #1, ie. “a newly married couple” from “Merriam Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary”(10th ed.). Do I understand only #1 is correct?
    Your first question brought to mind the common phrase "new-found friend". Also, Newfoundland. Sometimes the adverbial -ly is omitted in idiomatic use.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top